Warning: include(domaintitles/domaintitle_cdn.exoticindia.php3): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 751

Warning: include(): Failed opening 'domaintitles/domaintitle_cdn.exoticindia.php3' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/lib/php:/usr/local/lib/php') in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 751

Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address [email protected].

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Buddha In Bhumisparsha Mudra, Seated On The Mystical Throne Of Enlightenment

Buddha In Bhumisparsha Mudra, Seated On The Mystical Throne Of Enlightenment

The Buddha stands for all that is wise and compassionate. Having spent his youth trapped in life's luxuries (he was born to the Shakya clan ruler as prince of Kapilavastu, and given a fitting upbringing by His father), He took to harsh asceticism in a bid to seek answers to the questions that such a life inspired in Him nevertheless. His wanderings through the evregreen forests and plains of North India constitute almost another lifetime in His personal history, that culminated with His sitting down to meditate at the foot of the fateful tree at Bodh Gaya. When elightenment finally dawned on Him, He touched (sparsha) a hand to the earth (bhumi) to call upon it as witness to the transition of His soul. This magnificent sculpture of the former Shakyamuni captures Him in that all-important bhumisparsha mudra, His limbs gathered in the gracious poorna-padmasana, a palm opened outward on His lap.

This murti has been handpicked for the brilliant handiwork of the artisan who has poured into it the entirety of his devotion to Buddha. His lissome proportions are fit for a divine being; so is the intricately engraved robe that descends down His shoulders. His beauteous countenance, framed with kundalas dangling from His long earlobes, is such as to inspire a meditative trance in the onlooker. The throne He is seated on is the mystical picture of His enlightenment. From the elaborate aureole, the silhouette of which resembles wave layered upon wave, carved with a number of celestial beings; to the multi-tiered pedestal. Note the ethereal vines and creatures that have been sculpted onto each layer of the pedestal, the topmost one of which comprises of a row of lifelike lotus petals.

Post a comment +
Post
Corn-Silk Handloom Large Dhurrie From Sitapur with Kilim Weave

Corn-Silk Handloom Large Dhurrie From Sitapur with Kilim Weave

Geometric curves, rangoli-style florals, and gracefully stitched narrow panels characterise the Indian kilim rug. The one you see on this page has been handpicked from Sitapur, having emerged from the contemporary horizontal looms in use with contemporary artisans in the region. These looms are a later phenomenon - kilim rugs, of the flat-woven and knotted varieties - were originally woven on the vertical loom. Zoom in on each of the panels of this jute number to appreciate the complex interlocked tapestry weave, each coloured area achieved with wefts painstakingly handwoven back and forth into the warp.

In fact, this is what defines the kilim weave. The background, a creamy ivory colour in the field and pastel reds and oranges in the panels along the edges, has been woven in mechanically afterwards. Given the vibrant colour palette, it would be an eye-catchingly colourful item to add to your home decor; a cheerful start to your day as you roll it out prior to your yoga practice. It is fashioned from pure homegrown jute, a durable medium that would last long enough for this piece to become a family heirloom. Do not miss the miniscule white tassels along the edges, adding to this dhurrie an earthy, home-like appeal.

Post a comment +
Post
Devi Tara Wall-Hanging Mask, Gold Vines Spread Around Her Bust

Devi Tara Wall-Hanging Mask, Gold Vines Spread Around Her Bust

Devi Tara is the beloved of the gentle Buddhists of the mountains. She is their supreme deity, associated with maternal fearlessness and love, which are writ large on this divine facial sculpture. The gracious brow is complemented by half-shut eyes that are otherwise entrancing. The same descends into a long, angular nose, and a delicate mouth whose stance is unusually reserved. These features make for a composure of countenance that is superbly contained, possibly only for a celestial entity such as Her. A fire-like glow seems to emerge from the third eye that has emerged on Her temple, which is flanked by the gorgeous headband at the base of Her crown. The dense, gold-toned vines frame the composition.

Devi Tara is the spiritual protectress against the "eight great terrors" (as lore would have it), each of which is symbolic of spiritual impediments: lions (pride), elephants (delusion), fire (anger), snakes (envy), robbers (misguided notions), captivity (avarice), shipwreck (attachment), and demons (self-doubt). She is as much a virgin and a queen as She is a mother. Her virginity has little to do with the western theological emphasis on womanly chastity. Devi Tara's is a purity of the metaphysical level; She is unstained by the gross and the mundane. She arises out of the void as whole and independent. This mask of the wondrous Buddhist Devi inspires the devotee - its superbly precise handiwork does justice to Her visualisation.

Post a comment +
Post
Psychedelic Peacock Madhubani

Psychedelic Peacock Madhubani

You know a Madhubani when you see it. Spectacular geometric curves, bold black silhouettes complemented by minimal colouring, and a quintessentially Indian theme. This one has been handpicked from the studios of local artisans in the region in present-day Bihar. It is done on handmade paper with pigments made from traditional ingredients such as blended lampblack and rice powder. The beauty of the Indian peacock has been captured to perfection in this abstract composition that relies on a repetition of its one-of-a-kind feather-motif. Given how Madhubani art originated with gentle womenfolk seeking to decorate their dwellings, conceiving of this image on the scale of a mud-hut wall would begin to give you an idea of its charm.

A peacock with an elaborate, layered plumage constitutes the foreground. Its tiny body is made up of motifs, some of which are strategically filled in with paint, to create patterns that are seemingly hallucinogenic. On each corner of the bottom edge of the canvas is a scampering deer looking up at the gracious plumage in the centre. Two more peacocks with slightly less glamorous plumages grace the corners of the upper edge of the painting. The spaces amidst these gentle faunal motifs is filled in with more peacock feathers and coconut vines. Not how similar vines run along all four edges of the painting, which lends the composition some sort of a frame.

Post a comment +
Post
Bleached-Sand Tussar Sari from Bengal with Kantha-Embroidered Marriage Procession

Bleached-Sand Tussar Sari from Bengal with Kantha-Embroidered Marriage Procession

Tussar is one of the signature silks produced in the subcontinent. Its inimitable cream ivory colour makes it easily distinguishable, not to mention its relatively rugged texture. The saree you see on this page is a tussar silk number handpicked from Bengal. The strip of uniform kantha embroidery running along the edge makes for a very narrow border, but the motifs jutting into the field of the saree give the illusion of a border that is seductively thick. Note the characteristic drape and fall of tussar. Zooming in on the solid-coloured field would give you a fair idea of the texture that this rudimentary endemic silk is all about.

It is the kantha embroidery that dominates the border and pallu that gives personality to this saree. Kantha is the term for fabrics finished with running stitches done by hand, a technique perfected by Bengali women seeking to recycle old fabrics lying around the house. As could be made out from this saree, it results in homogeneous embellishments that are rich in colour and texture. The motif chosen is of a wedding procession, stitched repetitively in rows along the fabric. This would be a great saree to wear to daytime gatherings such as on casual luncheons with family and shopping trips with friends.

Post a comment +
Post
The Power Of Shivatandava

The Power Of Shivatandava

The beauty and power of Lord Shiva is undisputed. Whether it is His tigerskin-clad ascetic roop traversing mortally unattainable Himalayan passes or the fierce all-destructive dance of the Nataraja, few other deities inspire as intense a feeling of devotion in the Hindu heart as the Lord. He is to be found across the art and sculpture produced in the subcontinent, and the gorgeous wooden murti that you see on this page is no exception. Sculpted after the style of figures that adorn the walls of ancient South Indian temples, this work has been handpicked from the studios of local artisans in South India today. It is not only a fine example of a skill cultivated across generations of artisan families but also a visual rendition of the piety that runs in their humble hearts.

This South Indian temple-style wood sculpture depicts the Lord Shiva in the glory of His natya (dance). The hips and a knee are jutting out laterally, while the other leg is raised till the hem of the thigh-length dhoti. A great deal of detail has been carved onto the same, and dyed pastel reds and greens that complement the natural colour of the wood in question. A world of shringar graces His torso, and curvaceous vines descend from either side of His hips to even out the mass of the composition. Part of His tresses cascade down the back, cradling the kundalas dangling from His lobes; part of it flails on either side of His head as he motions, framing the implements in His posterior arms; and the renaming part of it is coiled into the jatamukuta that towers above His sharply chiselled brow.

Post a comment +
Post
The Serene Padmasana Devi Sarasvati

The Serene Padmasana Devi Sarasvati

She is the very picture of that inimitable calm brought about in one's disposition by learning and artistic endeavour. The Devi Sarasvati presides over learning and the arts, the prerequisites to the creative process, which in turn is presided over by Her husband, Lord Brahma. It is not only in Her gathered composure, but also in the elements that make up this watercolour. The soft petals of the blooming lotus that is Her throne, the susurrous waters that emerge from the gently melting glacier in the background, and the undulating curves of the mountains; each of these project a sense of stability, of being in motion that is measured. In fact, the aspect of steadiness dominates the composition; it is in the boulders that punctuate the flow of the river, the sweet pink buds that are yet to bloom, and the veena that She is casually strumming as She holds it in place on Her lap.

Few images are as beauteous and inspiring of devotion as that of padmasana Sarasvati Devi. She is seated in lalitasana, with a hand raised in blessing. The heavy drape of Her pristine silk saree is superbly lifelike, the weight of the zari-laden border and booties lying against Her glowing roseate skin. A densely bejewelled crown adds to the glamour of Her pale verdant halo. Note the natural tones that make up the gradient of the sky in the background. It is as if the sun would be conspicuous any moment now in the lap of those mountains, illuminating the beauty of our subject in full measure.

Post a comment +
Post
Runner from Mirzapur with Self Weave in Shades of Red

Runner from Mirzapur with Self Weave in Shades of Red

Mirzapur is known for its gorgeous handwoven rugs, of which this runner is a fine example. The region comprises of old weaver families, wherein the skill has been perfected over generations of practise with the loom. This explains the high-precision weave of this rug, which is best appreciated by zooming in on each unit surface area of this rug. Together with the zigzag-pattern and the strip of delicately tied tassels along the smaller edges, these are the hallmarks of the quintessential Indian rug.

The colour palette of this rug is what makes it a statement choice for home decor. A pale creamy red in the centre gives way to more full-bodied shades of the same colour. Lain along the length of your dining table or at the foot of your bed, it would set a gathered, almost sombre, tone to your space. It is the perfect conversation-starter for when you have guests over, given that it is a one-of-a-kind work of art made in a remote recess of North India. Having been handpicked for its beauty and workmanship, this is one buy you cannot go wrong with.

Post a comment +
Post
Tribal Youth Out On A Hunt

Tribal Youth Out On A Hunt

While each of our tribes comprise of a few families, the sheer variety of tribes to be found in the subcontinent is numberless. The ways of life and languages are distinct from one tribe to another, of which very little has been documented. This is because of how remote they are, and how close yet self-sufficient their economies are. Speaking of economy, art is a major part of tribal life-expression, which in turn plays a two-pronged role in their sustenance. One, art produced by the peoples of a tribe gives us first-hand insight into their unique culture, and serves to create and preserve knowledge of the same. Second, their characteristic handiwork elevates these works to a certain standard of international art.

The dynamic brass figurine you see on this page is one such work of art. It captures a quintessential aspect of Indian tribal life. Foraging, hunting, and gathering are their primary means of livelihood, so it is imperative that their menfolk know their way around the woods and the mountains. This young man is clad in a coarse dhoti, short enough to facilitate agility, and a turban to hold back his curls. Bracelets, anklets, and danglers constitute his adornments, which are probably the hallmarks of his clan. From the stance of his arms, he seems to be taking a short-distance aim at a small unsuspecting animal. He has three more arrows behind his back, the tips of which are visible from above his lean shoulders. Note the sharp curves that define his face - the large eyes, the handsome nose, and the barely-there moustache.

Post a comment +
Post
Desert-Skinned Beauty, Looking Out Her Door

Desert-Skinned Beauty, Looking Out Her Door

The tousled mass of her hair glows against the dim lamp that she has lit somewhere in her room, not within the view afforded by the frame. She has let it cascade to midway down her back, the desert tone of which comes across as highly seductive. From the gold and rubies and emeralds of Her statement shringar, to the band of turquoise brocade that is visible of her choli, bring out the beauty of her distinct complexion. Her form is gorgeous in a gamine way - skinny arms, the outline of her ribs protruding against her skin, and a face that would be lost without that expression. It is the cast of a lover's longing, made more intense by the smokey eye makeup and the quivering, lifelike lips.

The proportion of detail packed into this painting is superb, a hallmark of the painter's skill. The intricate carving of the wooden door, against which the subject leans almost helplessly. The pristine flowers in the foreground that add a generous hint of romance to the composition. Despite the limited perspective of this oil, a sense of distance is induced in the viewer (and it is not merely the lamp that is not within view). Her unblinking gaze reaches out into the distance, as she awaits the arrival of a mysterious entity. Clearly he loves him, and the wait for him is driving her mad. She clutches at the door in her ardour. Perhaps that hint of a smile on the corners of her lips are indicative of a deliciously familiar figure emerging in the distance.

Post a comment +
Post
«     Previous     3   4   5   6   7   8     Next     »
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Share with friends
Related Items
Goloka -Nag Champa Agarbathi (Pack 12 Packets)
Goloka -Nag Champa Agarbathi (Pack 12 Packets)
Goloka
$35.00
Goloka -Nag Champa Agarbathi (Pack 12 Packets)
Studies in Rgveda and Modern Sanskrit Literature
Studies in Rgveda and Modern Sanskrit Literature
Hardcover
S. Ranganath
$25.00
Studies in Rgveda and Modern Sanskrit Literature
Selfless Action - Compilation and Critical Analysis of The Practical Philosophy of Karma Yoga (Set of 2 Volumes)
Selfless Action - Compilation and Critical Analysis of The Practical Philosophy of Karma Yoga (Set of 2 Volumes)
Hardcover
G. Sankarasubba Ayyar
$50.00
Selfless Action - Compilation and Critical Analysis of The Practical Philosophy of Karma Yoga (Set of 2 Volumes)
Candle Stand
Candle Stand
Brass Sculpture
14.2 inch Height x 3.8 inch Width x 4 inch Depth
$135.00
Candle Stand
Peacock Hanging Bells
Peacock Hanging Bells
Brass Statue
9 inch Height x 10.5 inch Width X 10.5 inch Depth
27 inch - Chain Length
$155.00
Peacock Hanging Bells
Nandi Muzzling The Feet Of Ardhanarishvara
Nandi Muzzling The Feet Of Ardhanarishvara
Water Color Painting on Patti Paper
Folk Art From The Temple Town Puri (Orissa)
Artist: Rabi Behera
19 inches X 39.5 inches
$395.00
Nandi Muzzling The Feet Of Ardhanarishvara
Durga Yantra
Durga Yantra
Madhubani Painting on Hand Made Paper Treated with Cow Dung
Artist - Shri Dhirendra Jha and Shrimati Vidya Devi
10 inches x 14 inches
$55.00
Durga Yantra
Bon its Encounter With Buddhism in Tibet
Bon its Encounter With Buddhism in Tibet
Hardcover
B. L. Bansal
$28.00
Bon its Encounter With Buddhism in Tibet
Divine Wisdom - A Book on Eternal Truth of Life and Living
Divine Wisdom - A Book on Eternal Truth of Life and Living
Paperback
Swami Gyanratna
$23.00
Divine Wisdom - A Book on Eternal Truth of Life and Living
Twenty Two Wicks Peacock Puja Lamp With Bells
Twenty Two Wicks Peacock Puja Lamp With Bells
Brass Statue
15.8 inch Height x 9 inch Width x 9.8 inch Depth
$245.00
Twenty Two Wicks Peacock Puja Lamp With Bells
Show More
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2019 © Exotic India