Warning: include(domaintitles/domaintitle_cdn.exoticindia.php3): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 803

Warning: include(): Failed opening 'domaintitles/domaintitle_cdn.exoticindia.php3' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/lib/php:/usr/local/lib/php') in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 803

Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address [email protected].

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > History > A Forest Tribe of Borneo (Resource use among the Dayak Benuaq)
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
A Forest Tribe of Borneo (Resource use among the Dayak Benuaq)
Pages from the book
A Forest Tribe of Borneo (Resource use among the Dayak Benuaq)
Look Inside the Book
Description
About the Book

Here is the third volume in the series Man and Forest: a series trying to highlight the relevance of ‘indigenous knowledge’ of various tribal communities in the sustainable management of forests/local resources against the growing challenges of environmental hazards and a declining resource base.

The volume takes the reader to the Dayak Benuag village of Lempunah in Borneo (East Kalimantan, Indonesia) where, for over three hundred years, the local tribal population has made extensive use of its forest resources. More than a hundred locally-differentiated rice varieties and 150 other crops are cultivated over a mosaic forest of 9,200 ha. Besides maintaining a high level of bio-diversity, Lempunah villagers are managing an enormous reservoir of flora and fauna for their extended subsistence economy, including trade with various forest products over long distances. Market fluctuations and other uncertainties here are coped with by resource diversification and a high dynamic flexibility in switching between the use of resources.

Together with vivid descriptions, Christian Génner offers an insightful analysis of local resource use patterns, covering swidden agriculture, mixed forest gardens, rattan gardens, rubber gardens, and the non- cultivated forest ‘in-between’ and temporal and spatial aspects of life in Lempunah. Christian Génner has, for this study, applied ethnological, ecological, and geographical field-research methods.

About the Author

Christian Gonner is a_ biologist by profession, with specialised interests in ornithology. He also studied ethnology for years before his research work in Borneo. Indisputably a scholar with varied academic and research concerns, he is today recognised as a_ leading specialist in Applied Ecology, whose approach to resource management practices unites knowledge of natural and social sciences. Presently living in Sumatra with his family, Dr. Gonner is working for a nature conservation project. He has also been a consultant to several Indonesian development projects from time to time.

Foreword

SCIENTIFIC knowledge of local communities in developing countries with by and large sustainable management practises has a great ecological and political value for the global environmental protection agenda. The material Christian Gonner is providing and interpreting is a valuable contribution to understand an indigenous conceptualisation of local resource use and forest management. It shows a remarkable . geographical range of marketing and trade that transcends the widespread common notion of locally bound subsistence economies. The highly flexible modes of subsistence and trade of the Dayak Benuaq who live in Borneo (East Kalimantan) under conditions of economic uncertainty have been discussed with the author and are partly reflected on the background of experiences which were made in a research-network on the indigenous use and management of forests in the wider Himalayan context over the last nine years. The research network was initiated and co-ordinated by the Chair of Forest Policy and Forest Economics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. The book is the author’s PhD dissertation, in which one of the editors of this series acted as co-guide. It is the result of true interdisciplinary research and reasoning taking methodologies from the natural and social sciences into account.

This analysis of the lifestyle of the Dayak Benuaq of Lempunah village is published in a phase of transition, a time when their traditional mode of production and resource management is challenged by new and powerful interventions from outside. Economic and political interests have ventured into the interior of Borneo’s forests and change many conditions which have been essential to lead an almost independent tribal lifestyle over centuries. However, it is most interesting to gain a detailed insight into what a traditional tribal life- style was and, to a certain extend, still is and how it reflects the various adaptations to local environmental conditions.

The conditions that prevail in Indonesia today show the limitations of such communities as the Dayak Benuag to survive in continuation of their traditional patterns of resource use. These and their social norms and cultural values related to them are not only threatened by the pervading power of an emerging nation state and economic penetration of remote areas due to international commercial interests. A tribal society which is at the cross-roads of various options of a modernised, or better to say, post-traditional way of life has nothing else to rely on but its age-old cultural identity and mode of production to make a living from. In the long run, and this can be seen from the rationale applied in the Dayak Benuaq’s resource use patterns, their chance to adapt themselves to new socio-political conditions will largely depend on a timely transformation of their flexibility to react to environmental and any other changes.

Case studies such as the one presented in this book do not only contribute to the knowledge about a tribal life world which is fading away almost without being noticed. They are valuable because of their intricate knowledge of what is known by a forest dwelling culture who has appropriated the spirit and wealth of a world which was hitherto unknown to outsiders. They will always have their message to convey to the academic world and to political decision-makers who are trying to promote sustainability of resource use in the twenty-first century. Perhaps they can all learn from this forest tribe of Borneo.














A Forest Tribe of Borneo (Resource use among the Dayak Benuaq)

Item Code:
NAW019
Cover:
HARDCOVER
Edition:
2002
ISBN:
8124601933
Language:
English
Size:
8.50 X 5.50 inch
Pages:
366 (44 Colored Illustrations)
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 0.8 Kg
Price:
$45.00   Shipping Free
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
A Forest Tribe of Borneo (Resource use among the Dayak Benuaq)

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 107 times since 19th Feb, 2020
About the Book

Here is the third volume in the series Man and Forest: a series trying to highlight the relevance of ‘indigenous knowledge’ of various tribal communities in the sustainable management of forests/local resources against the growing challenges of environmental hazards and a declining resource base.

The volume takes the reader to the Dayak Benuag village of Lempunah in Borneo (East Kalimantan, Indonesia) where, for over three hundred years, the local tribal population has made extensive use of its forest resources. More than a hundred locally-differentiated rice varieties and 150 other crops are cultivated over a mosaic forest of 9,200 ha. Besides maintaining a high level of bio-diversity, Lempunah villagers are managing an enormous reservoir of flora and fauna for their extended subsistence economy, including trade with various forest products over long distances. Market fluctuations and other uncertainties here are coped with by resource diversification and a high dynamic flexibility in switching between the use of resources.

Together with vivid descriptions, Christian Génner offers an insightful analysis of local resource use patterns, covering swidden agriculture, mixed forest gardens, rattan gardens, rubber gardens, and the non- cultivated forest ‘in-between’ and temporal and spatial aspects of life in Lempunah. Christian Génner has, for this study, applied ethnological, ecological, and geographical field-research methods.

About the Author

Christian Gonner is a_ biologist by profession, with specialised interests in ornithology. He also studied ethnology for years before his research work in Borneo. Indisputably a scholar with varied academic and research concerns, he is today recognised as a_ leading specialist in Applied Ecology, whose approach to resource management practices unites knowledge of natural and social sciences. Presently living in Sumatra with his family, Dr. Gonner is working for a nature conservation project. He has also been a consultant to several Indonesian development projects from time to time.

Foreword

SCIENTIFIC knowledge of local communities in developing countries with by and large sustainable management practises has a great ecological and political value for the global environmental protection agenda. The material Christian Gonner is providing and interpreting is a valuable contribution to understand an indigenous conceptualisation of local resource use and forest management. It shows a remarkable . geographical range of marketing and trade that transcends the widespread common notion of locally bound subsistence economies. The highly flexible modes of subsistence and trade of the Dayak Benuaq who live in Borneo (East Kalimantan) under conditions of economic uncertainty have been discussed with the author and are partly reflected on the background of experiences which were made in a research-network on the indigenous use and management of forests in the wider Himalayan context over the last nine years. The research network was initiated and co-ordinated by the Chair of Forest Policy and Forest Economics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. The book is the author’s PhD dissertation, in which one of the editors of this series acted as co-guide. It is the result of true interdisciplinary research and reasoning taking methodologies from the natural and social sciences into account.

This analysis of the lifestyle of the Dayak Benuaq of Lempunah village is published in a phase of transition, a time when their traditional mode of production and resource management is challenged by new and powerful interventions from outside. Economic and political interests have ventured into the interior of Borneo’s forests and change many conditions which have been essential to lead an almost independent tribal lifestyle over centuries. However, it is most interesting to gain a detailed insight into what a traditional tribal life- style was and, to a certain extend, still is and how it reflects the various adaptations to local environmental conditions.

The conditions that prevail in Indonesia today show the limitations of such communities as the Dayak Benuag to survive in continuation of their traditional patterns of resource use. These and their social norms and cultural values related to them are not only threatened by the pervading power of an emerging nation state and economic penetration of remote areas due to international commercial interests. A tribal society which is at the cross-roads of various options of a modernised, or better to say, post-traditional way of life has nothing else to rely on but its age-old cultural identity and mode of production to make a living from. In the long run, and this can be seen from the rationale applied in the Dayak Benuaq’s resource use patterns, their chance to adapt themselves to new socio-political conditions will largely depend on a timely transformation of their flexibility to react to environmental and any other changes.

Case studies such as the one presented in this book do not only contribute to the knowledge about a tribal life world which is fading away almost without being noticed. They are valuable because of their intricate knowledge of what is known by a forest dwelling culture who has appropriated the spirit and wealth of a world which was hitherto unknown to outsiders. They will always have their message to convey to the academic world and to political decision-makers who are trying to promote sustainability of resource use in the twenty-first century. Perhaps they can all learn from this forest tribe of Borneo.














Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to A Forest Tribe of Borneo (Resource use among the Dayak Benuaq) (History | Books)

Tribal Religions
Item Code: NAD615
$77.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
India: An Illustrated Atlas of Tribal World
Item Code: NAF958
$77.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Marriage in Tribal Societies (Cultural Dynamics and Social Realiteis)
by Tamo Mibang and M.C. Behera
HARDCOVER (Edition: 2007)
Bookwell, Delhi
Item Code: NAU280
$29.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Tribal Folklore (An Introduction)
Item Code: NAG966
$21.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Tribal Movements in India (Set of Two Volumes)
Item Code: NAM955
$77.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Indian Literature in Tribal Languages: Mizo Songs and Folk Tales
by Laltluangliana Khiangte
Paperback (Edition: 2009)
Sahitya Akademi, Delhi
Item Code: IDH396
$16.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Sacrificing People (Invasions of a Tribal Landscape)
Deal 20% Off
by Felix Padel
Paperback (Edition: 2011)
Orient Blackswan Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAJ240
$37.00$29.60
You save: $7.40 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Maoists in India: Tribals Under Siege
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: NAF595
$26.00$20.80
You save: $5.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
An Approach to The Cultural Mapping of North-East India: In Respect of Tribal Tales
Deal 20% Off
by Pratibha Mandal
Hardcover (Edition: 2009)
The Asiatic Society
Item Code: NAB824
$62.00$49.60
You save: $12.40 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
INDIAN TRIBES: THROUGH THE AGES
Item Code: IDG182
$36.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
Great website! Easy to find things and easy to pay!!
Elaine, Australia
Always liked Exotic India for lots of choice and a brilliantly service.
Shanti, UK
You have a great selection of books, and it's easy and quickly to purchase from you. Thanks.
Ketil, Norway
Thank you so much for shipping Ma Shitala.  She arrived safely today on Buddha Purnima.  We greeted Her with camphor and conch blowing, and she now is on Ma Kali’s altar.  She is very beautiful.  Thank you for packing Her so well. Jai Ma
Usha, USA
Great site! Myriad of items across the cultural spectrum. Great search capability, too. If it's Indian, you'll probably find it here.
Mike, USA
I was very happy to find these great Hindu texts of the ancient times. Been a fan of both Mahabhratham and Ramayanam since I was a small boy. Now the whole family can enjoy these very important cultural texts at home.
Amaranath
Very old customer. service very good.
D K Mishra, USA
I want to switch from Amazon to Exotic India Art. Please keep up good job and competitive prices so that INDIAN community find a value in this website.
Sanjay, USA
I have received my parcel from postman. Very good service. So, Once again heartfully thank you so much to Exotic India.
Parag, India
My previous purchasing order has safely arrived. I'm impressed. My trust and confidence in your business still firmly, highly maintained. I've now become your regular customer, and looking forward to ordering some more in the near future.
Chamras, Thailand
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2020 © Exotic India