Warning: include(domaintitles/domaintitle_cdn.exoticindia.php3): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 921

Warning: include(): Failed opening 'domaintitles/domaintitle_cdn.exoticindia.php3' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/lib/php:/usr/local/lib/php') in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 921

Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address [email protected].

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Language and Literature > Sanskrit > An Introduction to Sanskrit (Applied Grammar and Composition)
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
An Introduction to Sanskrit (Applied Grammar and Composition)
Pages from the book
An Introduction to Sanskrit (Applied Grammar and Composition)
Look Inside the Book
Description
About the Book

For centuries the students had been asked to study Grammar twelve years to be at home with the Sanskrit language. The early European scholars had almost to undergo the same exercise, but what they brought out for their pupils was somewhat different. In the beginning, the, terms of the Hindu grammarians were uncouthly fitted in the western grammatical scheme, which were later on gradually given up. After several stages of simplification, the Sanskrit grammar has now >been reduced to the actual requirement of the classical texts. Macdonell's or Stenzler's revised grammars perhaps represent the points of culmination. But these scholars had in their mind only the western students who had studied Greek and Latin before taking up Sanskrit. Therefore male hate heath sarvam may be the first exercise in a western Sanskrit Granimar, but an Indian teacher may be puzzled when asked to explain this sentence to his students in the first lesson.

Therefore, we require primer of Sanskrit which does not anticipate the knowledge of any Other language. The structure of Sanskrit itself is to be revealed to the students.

The noted peculiarity of this book is that it gives exercises on transformation of sentences. Its value will be realised only when the exercises are taker up.

About the Author

Madhusudan Mishra passed his B.A. (Hons.) Examination in Sanskrit in 1956 and M.A. Examination in Sanskrit in 1958 from Patna University. In both the examination he stood first in first class and was awarded three gold-medals. He joined Goenka College, Sitamarhi in 1959 as lecturer in Sanskrit, and later he Indogermanisches Seminar of the University of Frankfurt in 1965. He joined the Rashtriya Sanskrit Sansthan in 1973 as Assistant Director and became Deputy Director (Academic) in 1977. He wrote lessons for the Correspondence Course of the Lower and Higher levels through the medium of Hindi and English.

Mishra has particular interest in historical and comparative linguistics, and has specialised in the preparation of language teaching courses. The present book is the result of his years of tireless work.

Preface

The Sanskrit language has been the vehicle of Indian thoughts in all their variations at all periods in our history. Among the vernaculars of ancient India, Pali became associated with a sect of Buddhism and a form of Prakrit with Jainism, but Sanskrit has remained associated with all of them. Even some new sects, which arose out of Bhakti-movement in the medieval history, have now turned to Sanskrit, though their songs and prayers are written in the vernaculars of that period. Many educated persons in service, who have some time at their disposal before and after their duty hours, often ask for simple text-books and easy manuals of Sanskrit. Even our elders, who have retired from services, want to pass the evening of their life in the mild sunshine of religious and philosophical books. Generally the epics and Puranas attract them, although some others may like to read Upanisads or even the older poetry of the Vedas. Many others may find pleasure in the secular poetry of the classical authors. This book may serve the purpose of all of them.

The present Sanskrit syllabi of the Indian universities are hopeless. There is no provision for desk-work, and instruction is imparted in such a way that the teacher hardly goes to the black-board even in the teaching of the language-items of Sanskrit. The result is that a student of M. A. knows only as much of the Sanskrit language as a student of B. A., though the former becomes aware of a larger number of Sanskrit books and authors. Unless there are exercises and practices on the language-items of Sanskrit, a student cannot be said to have mastered the language. The old proverb gastramukham vyakaranam has been greatly ignored today. This book also intends to chastise such students, providing a good deal of desk-work for them.

The grammar does not follow the traditional order, because our purpose is to introduce the easier elements of the Sanskrit language first, and then the difficult ones. The lessons have been prepared in the form of a ladder, so that any jump may be injurious. It is also advisable to go with slow speed. One should go to the next lesson only when the first is properly understood. It should also be remembered that a short time everyday is more useful than gigantic effort now and then. Whenever the exercises are taken up, the corresponding lessons or paragraphs must be read at least twice or thrice.

The exercises do not contain passages for translation into Sanskrit, because our main purpose has been to acquaint the readers with the classical authors. Therefore, we have thought of only ope-way translation, namely from Sanskrit into English. But many of us may also like the other way, namely from English into Sanskrit. For such persons, the following procedure may be suggested : let the passages which have been translated from Sanskrit into English be taken as new exercises; retranslate them into your own Sanskrit, and then compare with the original. The comparison may not be encouraging, but one is bound to be wiser. There are many exercises on the transformation of sentences.

After all the exercises have been solved, one is in a position to proceed alone. The purchase of a good dictionary may be advised. Perhaps Apte's or Monier-Williams' dictionary may be a good choice. Then one may turn to the study of classical texts with the help of Sanskrit commentaries. We wish good success.

At the end, it is my duty to thank my friends and well-wishers:

Prof. Dr. B. Schlerath of the tndogermanisches Seminar of the University of Frankfurt (1967) had read the first 92, pages of the original type-script and suggested certain corrections, which were taken note of. Sri Jeewan Pani of Sangeet Natak Academy, New Delhi, had read the whole book in typed form, and his comments were very enlightening.

I also thank my wife Smt. Tara Mishra for her keeping me free from the domestic worries, so that I could give as much time as possible in the preparation of the book. I thank my son Sanjay for all the drawings appearing in the book.

Lastly, but not t he least, I thank Janashakti Mudrana Yantralaya, Naveen Shandara, for careful and nice printing, and the Ministry of Education and Culture, Government of India, for financial assistance towards the publication of the book.

**Contents and Sample Pages**















An Introduction to Sanskrit (Applied Grammar and Composition)

Item Code:
NAS439
Cover:
HARDCOVER
Edition:
2018
ISBN:
9788171100835
Language:
Sanskrit and English
Size:
9.00 X 6.00 inch
Pages:
404
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 0.59 Kg
Price:
$31.00   Shipping Free
Look Inside the Book
Be the first to rate this product
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
An Introduction to Sanskrit (Applied Grammar and Composition)
From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 3455 times since 16th Aug, 2019
About the Book

For centuries the students had been asked to study Grammar twelve years to be at home with the Sanskrit language. The early European scholars had almost to undergo the same exercise, but what they brought out for their pupils was somewhat different. In the beginning, the, terms of the Hindu grammarians were uncouthly fitted in the western grammatical scheme, which were later on gradually given up. After several stages of simplification, the Sanskrit grammar has now >been reduced to the actual requirement of the classical texts. Macdonell's or Stenzler's revised grammars perhaps represent the points of culmination. But these scholars had in their mind only the western students who had studied Greek and Latin before taking up Sanskrit. Therefore male hate heath sarvam may be the first exercise in a western Sanskrit Granimar, but an Indian teacher may be puzzled when asked to explain this sentence to his students in the first lesson.

Therefore, we require primer of Sanskrit which does not anticipate the knowledge of any Other language. The structure of Sanskrit itself is to be revealed to the students.

The noted peculiarity of this book is that it gives exercises on transformation of sentences. Its value will be realised only when the exercises are taker up.

About the Author

Madhusudan Mishra passed his B.A. (Hons.) Examination in Sanskrit in 1956 and M.A. Examination in Sanskrit in 1958 from Patna University. In both the examination he stood first in first class and was awarded three gold-medals. He joined Goenka College, Sitamarhi in 1959 as lecturer in Sanskrit, and later he Indogermanisches Seminar of the University of Frankfurt in 1965. He joined the Rashtriya Sanskrit Sansthan in 1973 as Assistant Director and became Deputy Director (Academic) in 1977. He wrote lessons for the Correspondence Course of the Lower and Higher levels through the medium of Hindi and English.

Mishra has particular interest in historical and comparative linguistics, and has specialised in the preparation of language teaching courses. The present book is the result of his years of tireless work.

Preface

The Sanskrit language has been the vehicle of Indian thoughts in all their variations at all periods in our history. Among the vernaculars of ancient India, Pali became associated with a sect of Buddhism and a form of Prakrit with Jainism, but Sanskrit has remained associated with all of them. Even some new sects, which arose out of Bhakti-movement in the medieval history, have now turned to Sanskrit, though their songs and prayers are written in the vernaculars of that period. Many educated persons in service, who have some time at their disposal before and after their duty hours, often ask for simple text-books and easy manuals of Sanskrit. Even our elders, who have retired from services, want to pass the evening of their life in the mild sunshine of religious and philosophical books. Generally the epics and Puranas attract them, although some others may like to read Upanisads or even the older poetry of the Vedas. Many others may find pleasure in the secular poetry of the classical authors. This book may serve the purpose of all of them.

The present Sanskrit syllabi of the Indian universities are hopeless. There is no provision for desk-work, and instruction is imparted in such a way that the teacher hardly goes to the black-board even in the teaching of the language-items of Sanskrit. The result is that a student of M. A. knows only as much of the Sanskrit language as a student of B. A., though the former becomes aware of a larger number of Sanskrit books and authors. Unless there are exercises and practices on the language-items of Sanskrit, a student cannot be said to have mastered the language. The old proverb gastramukham vyakaranam has been greatly ignored today. This book also intends to chastise such students, providing a good deal of desk-work for them.

The grammar does not follow the traditional order, because our purpose is to introduce the easier elements of the Sanskrit language first, and then the difficult ones. The lessons have been prepared in the form of a ladder, so that any jump may be injurious. It is also advisable to go with slow speed. One should go to the next lesson only when the first is properly understood. It should also be remembered that a short time everyday is more useful than gigantic effort now and then. Whenever the exercises are taken up, the corresponding lessons or paragraphs must be read at least twice or thrice.

The exercises do not contain passages for translation into Sanskrit, because our main purpose has been to acquaint the readers with the classical authors. Therefore, we have thought of only ope-way translation, namely from Sanskrit into English. But many of us may also like the other way, namely from English into Sanskrit. For such persons, the following procedure may be suggested : let the passages which have been translated from Sanskrit into English be taken as new exercises; retranslate them into your own Sanskrit, and then compare with the original. The comparison may not be encouraging, but one is bound to be wiser. There are many exercises on the transformation of sentences.

After all the exercises have been solved, one is in a position to proceed alone. The purchase of a good dictionary may be advised. Perhaps Apte's or Monier-Williams' dictionary may be a good choice. Then one may turn to the study of classical texts with the help of Sanskrit commentaries. We wish good success.

At the end, it is my duty to thank my friends and well-wishers:

Prof. Dr. B. Schlerath of the tndogermanisches Seminar of the University of Frankfurt (1967) had read the first 92, pages of the original type-script and suggested certain corrections, which were taken note of. Sri Jeewan Pani of Sangeet Natak Academy, New Delhi, had read the whole book in typed form, and his comments were very enlightening.

I also thank my wife Smt. Tara Mishra for her keeping me free from the domestic worries, so that I could give as much time as possible in the preparation of the book. I thank my son Sanjay for all the drawings appearing in the book.

Lastly, but not t he least, I thank Janashakti Mudrana Yantralaya, Naveen Shandara, for careful and nice printing, and the Ministry of Education and Culture, Government of India, for financial assistance towards the publication of the book.

**Contents and Sample Pages**















Post a Comment
 
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to An Introduction to Sanskrit (Applied Grammar and Composition) (Language and Literature | Books)

Hindi Grammar and Composition for Anglo Indian Schools (An Old and Rare Book)
PAPERBACK (Edition: 1997)
Allied Publishers Pvt. Limited
Item Code: NAR618
$21.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
A Higher Sanskrit Grammar
Item Code: IDD544
$29.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
A Sanskrit Grammar For Students
Item Code: IDD540
$29.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Dimensions of Panini Grammar: The Indian Grammatical System
Deal 20% Off
by Kapil Kapoor
Hardcover (Edition: 2005)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDE791
$40.00$32.00
You save: $8.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Studies in Sanskrit Grammars: Proceedings of the Vyakarana Section of the 14th World Sanskrit Conference
Deal 20% Off
by Various Author
Hardcover (Edition: 2012)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAD141
$57.00$45.60
You save: $11.40 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
HISTORICAL GRAMMAR OF APABHRAMSA (An Old Book)
Item Code: IDD558
$62.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
I’ve started receiving many of the books I’ve ordered and every single one of them (thus far) has been fantastic - both the books themselves, and the execution of the shipping. Safe to say I’ll be ordering many more books from your website :)
Hithesh, USA
I have received the book Evolution II.  Thank you so much for all of your assistance in making this book available to me.  You have been so helpful and kind.
Colleen, USA
Thanks Exotic India, I just received a set of two volume books: Brahmasutra Catuhsutri Sankara Bhasyam
I Gede Tunas
You guys are beyond amazing. The books you provide not many places have and I for one am so thankful to have found you.
Lulian, UK
This is my first purchase from Exotic India and its really good to have such store with online buying option. Thanks, looking ahead to purchase many more such exotic product from you.
Probir, UAE
I received the kaftan today via FedEx. Your care in sending the order, packaging and methods, are exquisite. You have dressed my body in comfort and fashion for my constrained quarantine in the several kaftans ordered in the last 6 months. And I gifted my sister with one of the orders. So pleased to have made a connection with you.
EB Cuya FIGG, USA
Thank you for your wonderful service and amazing book selection. We are long time customers and have never been disappointed by your great store. Thank you and we will continue to shop at your store
Michael, USA
I am extremely happy with the two I have already received!
Robert, UK
I have just received the top and it is beautiful 
Parvathi, Malaysia
I received ordered books in perfect condition. Thank You!
Vladimirs, Sweden
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2021 © Exotic India