Warning: include(domaintitles/domaintitle_cdn.exoticindia.php3): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 921

Warning: include(): Failed opening 'domaintitles/domaintitle_cdn.exoticindia.php3' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/lib/php:/usr/local/lib/php') in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 921

Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address [email protected].

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > History > Of Sadhus and Spinners (Australian Encounters with India)
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Of Sadhus and Spinners (Australian Encounters with India)
Pages from the book
Of Sadhus and Spinners (Australian Encounters with India)
Look Inside the Book
Description

About the Book

 

Despite a 'shared history of British imperialism, and commonalities like the English language, a democratic polity and a craze for cricket, Australians and Indians know very little about each other. Of Sadhus and Spinners attempts to correct this with a range of stories that trace the chequered history of interactions between the two nations.

 

From John Lang's 'The Mohammedan Mother' (1859) to Yasmine Gooneratne's 'Masterpiece' (2002), the stories in this anthology foreground a variety of literary responses to Indo-Australian encounters. There are stories here of Australian visitors to India who face not only physical hardships but also challenges to their image of themselves as democratic and egalitarian, and tales that indicate the Australian's fascination with the figure of the guru. Also included are stories about and by Indians-immigrants or temporary visitors-in Australia. While 'Kumari', by pioneering writer Mena Abdullah, reveals racial prejudice in rural Australia, Manik Datar's 'My Sister's Mother' brings the comedy of cultural difference into play in the setting of a suburban kitchen.

 

Thoughtful, exploratory and often just wide-eyed in its observation of strange new worlds, the anthology provides insights into an array of fascinating cross-cultural encounters-emotional, physical and spiritual-between Australia and India over the past century and a half.

 

Introduction

 

THE STORIES IN THIS ANTHOLOGY show a variety of encounters-mental, physical and spiritual-of Australians with India over the past century and a half. Readers of these stories will engage with human dramas which reveal a fascinating range of cross-cultural encounters and emotional responses to them. Many of these stories go beyond a mere touristic interest in India and reveal interesting observations and insights within the narrative frames chosen by their authors.

 

Twenty-first century Australians like to see themselves as developing a special relationship with countries of the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. Yet the stories in this volume trace a chequered history of human interactions with India, ranging from bewilderment and anxiety to humour and happiness. Despite their shared history of British imperial ambition and positive legacies such as the English language, democratic institutions and the inestimable game of cricket, Australians and Indians know very little about each other's literature. This selection of stories attempts to fill part of that gap by showing a range of Australian responses to India. Perhaps it will stimulate a later volume of Indian literary responses to Australia.

 

Cross-cultural narratives come from nineteenth-century writers as well as from more contemporary Australians. John Lang's 'The Mohammedan Mother', for instance, was published in 1859 and shows the quality of an Indian woman's love for her husband and child that verges on 'devotional'. Described by CO. Narasimhaiah as 'the first Australian-born novelist on Indian soil', Lang lived for many years in India and edited a newspaper, Mojussilite, in Meerut. As he thinks about an Indian woman to whom he is attracted, Lang's narrator exhibits an understanding of the woman's psyche, her devotional and sacrificial nature. The outsider's insight may reveal as much about himself as about the' other'.

 

Another nineteenth-century Australian author to show a special interest in India was Alfred Deakin. Deakin visited India in the early 1890s, before rising to prominence as Australia's second prime minister. Deakin's graphic description of ' irrigated India', with its focus on the physical and spiritual value of water in dry countries together with his later statements about the need for dialogue between Australian and Indian thinkers in universities, retains its prophetic force a century later.

 

The charm and fascination that Indian folklore can hold for an Australian reader or listener is evident in several stories in this volume. In Mary C. Elkington's 'The Soul of the Melon Man' (I 908), for instance, her character Mrs Seymour listens closely to the narrative of her Ayah, which epitomizes the value of renunciation-a virtue often seen as central to Indian philosophical thought. A different twist is given to traditional tales in Sri Lanka-born Australian author Yasmine Goonerarne's story 'Masterpiece'. This story, based on a tale Gooneratne had heard on a train trip from New Delhi to Hyderabad in 1995, presents a clash between the 'modern' egalitarian expectations of Australians and traditional Indian notions of the 'genius' of a poet. With consummate skill, Gooneratne (who has researched and published on Jane Austen), creates an amusing comedy of competing cultural styles, values and issues.

 

There is no space in this Introduction to introduce the reader to the full range of interests and literary qualities represented in this anthology. But we can point to some recurring interests and concerns. Prominent among these are the stories of Australian visitors to India who encounter not only physical hardships, but also challenges to their image of themselves as democratic and egalitarian (eg. Clark, Koch). On the other hand, David Maloufs autobiographical essay-story 'A Foot in the Stream' reveals a relaxed, liberal and democratic attitude and a certain awe as the narrator observes the patience of Indian crowds. Humour is introduced in Dal Stivens's cricket story 'The Strange Business at Bombay and Madras'. The story reveals cricketers and commentators on the great game to be 'spinners' in more ways than one.

 

A number of stories in this book cluster around the figure of the guru, indicating an Australian fascination with this figure. The role of gurus (and sometimes sadhus, or holy men) as enunciators of Indian philosophy and expounders of Indian texts is widely accepted and respected in India, but their role as spiritual guides and instruments of liberation is questioned by many Hindus. For the outsider, the guru is often fore grounded as a marker of Hinduism, especially in an age when yoga has acquired followers a poetic transcendence through yoga of what could otherwise have been a superficial touristic experience. Satendra and an, a Fiji-born Australian, provides a contrasting comic perspective on his schoolteacher guru. Geoffrey Bewley's story 'Passage from India' offers both perspectives-the adulation of a true believer and the ironic scepticism of an Australian male who sees the guru's influence destroying his marriage.

 

This collection also contains stories about Indians in Australia-as immigrants, or temporary visitors. Mena Abdullah deserves special notice as a pioneer writer of Indian descent. She was born in Australia in 1930, the daughter of a Punjabi man who had arrived in Australia in the 1880s. Mena was brought up on a farm in New South Wales. In 'Kumari', the narrator describes herself as 'a dark girl in a white man's country, a Punjabi Muslim in a Christian country'. The incidents depicted in this story tell of racial prejudice in rural Australia as well as compassionate Australians who care for the newcomers. The story reveals the attempt by members of the narrator's family to keep the culture of their homeland alive, together with the pleasures and perils of attempting to do this. Mena Abdullah's tale of an upbringing in rural Australia has its counterpart in stories by urban or suburban Indians in Australia in the late twentieth or early twenty-first century, including Sujatha Fernandes and Manik Datar. In her delightful story 'My Sister's Mother', Manik Datar brings the comedy of cultural difference into play within the setting of a suburban kitchen.

 

The stories in this anthology, including those not mentioned in this Introduction, display a variety of literary responses to the interaction of Australians and Indians since the mid-nineteenth century. In these stories, we see Australian writers grappling with Indian realities and the literary forms with which to engage them. We also see the early stages of an Indian diaspora engaging with the geography and culture of Australia. Of Sadhus and Spinners: Australian Encounters with India offers both literary interest and new perspectives on a changing world of which Australian- Indian relations are a vital part. We believe that the stories in this book will give further depth to a bilateral relationship which is set to thrive in the early twenty-first century.

 

Contents

 

Introduction

vii

1.

The Mohammedan Mother

1

2.

Our Nearest Great Country

18

3.

The Soul of the Melon Man

22

4.

My Friend, the Maharajah

26

5.

Black and White

31

6.

The Khyber Pass and a Kidnapping

36

7.

A Democrat on the Ganges

47

8.

Mrs James Greene

55

9.

Kumari

82

10

Sadhus and Sahibs

89

11.

The Clothesline in the Himalayas

99

12.

Meeting Mister Ghosh

102

13.

The Elephant Stop

111

14.

The Strange Business at Bombay and Madras

115

15.

Passage from India

126

16.

A Foot in the Stream

142

17.

The Guru

149

18.

Monsoon

159

19.

Maisie Goes to India

166

20.

My Sister's Mother

183

21.

A Pocket Full of Stories

187

22.

Masterpiece

192

Notes on Contributors

199

Notes on Editors

203

Copyright Acknowledgments

204

 

Sample Page


Of Sadhus and Spinners (Australian Encounters with India)

Deal 20% Off
Item Code:
NAJ616
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2009
ISBN:
9788172238483
Language:
English
Size:
8.5 inch x 5.5 inch
Pages:
216
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 240 gms
Price:
$21.00
Discounted:
$16.80   Shipping Free
You Save:
$4.20 (20%)
Look Inside the Book
Be the first to rate this product
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Of Sadhus and Spinners (Australian Encounters with India)
From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 3442 times since 3rd Nov, 2014

About the Book

 

Despite a 'shared history of British imperialism, and commonalities like the English language, a democratic polity and a craze for cricket, Australians and Indians know very little about each other. Of Sadhus and Spinners attempts to correct this with a range of stories that trace the chequered history of interactions between the two nations.

 

From John Lang's 'The Mohammedan Mother' (1859) to Yasmine Gooneratne's 'Masterpiece' (2002), the stories in this anthology foreground a variety of literary responses to Indo-Australian encounters. There are stories here of Australian visitors to India who face not only physical hardships but also challenges to their image of themselves as democratic and egalitarian, and tales that indicate the Australian's fascination with the figure of the guru. Also included are stories about and by Indians-immigrants or temporary visitors-in Australia. While 'Kumari', by pioneering writer Mena Abdullah, reveals racial prejudice in rural Australia, Manik Datar's 'My Sister's Mother' brings the comedy of cultural difference into play in the setting of a suburban kitchen.

 

Thoughtful, exploratory and often just wide-eyed in its observation of strange new worlds, the anthology provides insights into an array of fascinating cross-cultural encounters-emotional, physical and spiritual-between Australia and India over the past century and a half.

 

Introduction

 

THE STORIES IN THIS ANTHOLOGY show a variety of encounters-mental, physical and spiritual-of Australians with India over the past century and a half. Readers of these stories will engage with human dramas which reveal a fascinating range of cross-cultural encounters and emotional responses to them. Many of these stories go beyond a mere touristic interest in India and reveal interesting observations and insights within the narrative frames chosen by their authors.

 

Twenty-first century Australians like to see themselves as developing a special relationship with countries of the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. Yet the stories in this volume trace a chequered history of human interactions with India, ranging from bewilderment and anxiety to humour and happiness. Despite their shared history of British imperial ambition and positive legacies such as the English language, democratic institutions and the inestimable game of cricket, Australians and Indians know very little about each other's literature. This selection of stories attempts to fill part of that gap by showing a range of Australian responses to India. Perhaps it will stimulate a later volume of Indian literary responses to Australia.

 

Cross-cultural narratives come from nineteenth-century writers as well as from more contemporary Australians. John Lang's 'The Mohammedan Mother', for instance, was published in 1859 and shows the quality of an Indian woman's love for her husband and child that verges on 'devotional'. Described by CO. Narasimhaiah as 'the first Australian-born novelist on Indian soil', Lang lived for many years in India and edited a newspaper, Mojussilite, in Meerut. As he thinks about an Indian woman to whom he is attracted, Lang's narrator exhibits an understanding of the woman's psyche, her devotional and sacrificial nature. The outsider's insight may reveal as much about himself as about the' other'.

 

Another nineteenth-century Australian author to show a special interest in India was Alfred Deakin. Deakin visited India in the early 1890s, before rising to prominence as Australia's second prime minister. Deakin's graphic description of ' irrigated India', with its focus on the physical and spiritual value of water in dry countries together with his later statements about the need for dialogue between Australian and Indian thinkers in universities, retains its prophetic force a century later.

 

The charm and fascination that Indian folklore can hold for an Australian reader or listener is evident in several stories in this volume. In Mary C. Elkington's 'The Soul of the Melon Man' (I 908), for instance, her character Mrs Seymour listens closely to the narrative of her Ayah, which epitomizes the value of renunciation-a virtue often seen as central to Indian philosophical thought. A different twist is given to traditional tales in Sri Lanka-born Australian author Yasmine Goonerarne's story 'Masterpiece'. This story, based on a tale Gooneratne had heard on a train trip from New Delhi to Hyderabad in 1995, presents a clash between the 'modern' egalitarian expectations of Australians and traditional Indian notions of the 'genius' of a poet. With consummate skill, Gooneratne (who has researched and published on Jane Austen), creates an amusing comedy of competing cultural styles, values and issues.

 

There is no space in this Introduction to introduce the reader to the full range of interests and literary qualities represented in this anthology. But we can point to some recurring interests and concerns. Prominent among these are the stories of Australian visitors to India who encounter not only physical hardships, but also challenges to their image of themselves as democratic and egalitarian (eg. Clark, Koch). On the other hand, David Maloufs autobiographical essay-story 'A Foot in the Stream' reveals a relaxed, liberal and democratic attitude and a certain awe as the narrator observes the patience of Indian crowds. Humour is introduced in Dal Stivens's cricket story 'The Strange Business at Bombay and Madras'. The story reveals cricketers and commentators on the great game to be 'spinners' in more ways than one.

 

A number of stories in this book cluster around the figure of the guru, indicating an Australian fascination with this figure. The role of gurus (and sometimes sadhus, or holy men) as enunciators of Indian philosophy and expounders of Indian texts is widely accepted and respected in India, but their role as spiritual guides and instruments of liberation is questioned by many Hindus. For the outsider, the guru is often fore grounded as a marker of Hinduism, especially in an age when yoga has acquired followers a poetic transcendence through yoga of what could otherwise have been a superficial touristic experience. Satendra and an, a Fiji-born Australian, provides a contrasting comic perspective on his schoolteacher guru. Geoffrey Bewley's story 'Passage from India' offers both perspectives-the adulation of a true believer and the ironic scepticism of an Australian male who sees the guru's influence destroying his marriage.

 

This collection also contains stories about Indians in Australia-as immigrants, or temporary visitors. Mena Abdullah deserves special notice as a pioneer writer of Indian descent. She was born in Australia in 1930, the daughter of a Punjabi man who had arrived in Australia in the 1880s. Mena was brought up on a farm in New South Wales. In 'Kumari', the narrator describes herself as 'a dark girl in a white man's country, a Punjabi Muslim in a Christian country'. The incidents depicted in this story tell of racial prejudice in rural Australia as well as compassionate Australians who care for the newcomers. The story reveals the attempt by members of the narrator's family to keep the culture of their homeland alive, together with the pleasures and perils of attempting to do this. Mena Abdullah's tale of an upbringing in rural Australia has its counterpart in stories by urban or suburban Indians in Australia in the late twentieth or early twenty-first century, including Sujatha Fernandes and Manik Datar. In her delightful story 'My Sister's Mother', Manik Datar brings the comedy of cultural difference into play within the setting of a suburban kitchen.

 

The stories in this anthology, including those not mentioned in this Introduction, display a variety of literary responses to the interaction of Australians and Indians since the mid-nineteenth century. In these stories, we see Australian writers grappling with Indian realities and the literary forms with which to engage them. We also see the early stages of an Indian diaspora engaging with the geography and culture of Australia. Of Sadhus and Spinners: Australian Encounters with India offers both literary interest and new perspectives on a changing world of which Australian- Indian relations are a vital part. We believe that the stories in this book will give further depth to a bilateral relationship which is set to thrive in the early twenty-first century.

 

Contents

 

Introduction

vii

1.

The Mohammedan Mother

1

2.

Our Nearest Great Country

18

3.

The Soul of the Melon Man

22

4.

My Friend, the Maharajah

26

5.

Black and White

31

6.

The Khyber Pass and a Kidnapping

36

7.

A Democrat on the Ganges

47

8.

Mrs James Greene

55

9.

Kumari

82

10

Sadhus and Sahibs

89

11.

The Clothesline in the Himalayas

99

12.

Meeting Mister Ghosh

102

13.

The Elephant Stop

111

14.

The Strange Business at Bombay and Madras

115

15.

Passage from India

126

16.

A Foot in the Stream

142

17.

The Guru

149

18.

Monsoon

159

19.

Maisie Goes to India

166

20.

My Sister's Mother

183

21.

A Pocket Full of Stories

187

22.

Masterpiece

192

Notes on Contributors

199

Notes on Editors

203

Copyright Acknowledgments

204

 

Sample Page


Post a Comment
 
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Of Sadhus and Spinners (Australian Encounters with India) (History | Books)

History of Hindu-Christian Encounters (AD 304 to 1996)
by Sita Ram Goel
Paperback (Edition: 2016)
Voice of India, New Delhi
Item Code: NAM380
$31.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Tulsi and the Cross (Anthropology and the Colonial Encounter in Goa)
Deal 20% Off
by Rosa Maria Perez
Hardcover (Edition: 2013)
Orient Blackswan Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAG483
$43.00$34.40
You save: $8.60 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Cultural Encounters in India (The Local Co-Workers of The Tranquebar Mission, 18th to 19th Century)
Deal 20% Off
by Heike Liebau
Hardcover (Edition: 2013)
Social Science Press
Item Code: NAG053
$57.00$45.60
You save: $11.40 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
India Indonesia: Legacy of Intimate Encounters
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: NAL486
$31.00$24.80
You save: $6.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Three Ways To Be Alien (Travails and Encounters in The Early Modern World)
by Sanjay Subrahmanyam
Hardcover (Edition: 2011)
Permanent Black
Item Code: NAF579
$31.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Encounters Real and Surreal
by V.N. Narayanan
Hardcover (Edition: 2014)
Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan
Item Code: NAI371
$31.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Asian Encounters - Exploroing Connected Histories
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: NAL257
$67.00$53.60
You save: $13.40 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
A Touch of Greatness (Encounters With The Eminent)
Deal 20% Off
by R. M. Lala
Paperback (Edition: 2011)
Rupa Publication Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAD395
$17.50$14.00
You save: $3.50 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
After Elwin: Encounters with tribal life in Central India
by Prosenjit Das Gupta
Paperback (Edition: 2007)
Chronicle Books, New Delhi
Item Code: IDJ822
$33.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Dharma in Early Brahmanic, Buddhist and Jain Traditions
by Vincent Sekhar
Hardcover (Edition: 2003)
Sri Satguru Publications
Item Code: IHL047
$31.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
Thank you guys! I got the book! Your relentless effort to set this order right is much appreciated!!
Utpal, USA
You guys always provide the best customer care. Thank you so much for this.
Devin, USA
On the 4th of January I received the ordered Peacock Bell Lamps in excellent condition. Thank you very much. 
Alexander, Moscow
Gracias por todo, Parvati es preciosa, ya le he recibido.
Joan Carlos, Spain
We received the item in good shape without any damage. It is simply gorgeous. Look forward to more business with you. Thank you.
Sarabjit, USA
Your sculpture is truly beautiful and of inspiring quality!  I wish you continuous great success so that you may always be able to offer such beauty to all people throughout the world! Thank you for caring about your customers as well as the standard of your products.  It is extremely appreciated!! Sending you much love.
Deborah, USA
I’m glad you guys understand my side, well you guys have one of the best international store,  And I will probably continue being pleased costumer Thank you guys so much.
Renato, Brazil
I'm always so appreciative of Exotic India. You have such a terrific website, and great customer service. I wish you all the best, and hope you have a happy new year!
Eric, USA
A Statue was ordered on Dec 22nd and Paid 194.25 including FREE DELIVERY for me as a GIFT for Christmas and they Confirmed that it will be there in 4-5 days but it NEVER arrived till 30th of December and inspite of my various emails they only replied that it is being finished and will be shipped in 24hrs but that was a LIE and no further delivery information was every sent to me. I called and left a message on the phone number listed on their website which is a NY number but no one answered that phone and I left messages but no reply or update on my Statue was sent to me inspite of my daily emails to know the status. I still await this Statue but NO RESPONSIBLE REPLY.
Rita Wason
I got my order today. It was well packed and looks lovely.
Nirmaladevi, USA
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2021 © Exotic India