10" The Thrice Bent Lovers In Brass | Handmade | Made In India

10" The Thrice Bent Lovers In Brass | Handmade | Made In India

FREE Delivery
$330
Quantity
Usually ships in 10 days
Item Code: ZM69
Specifications:
Brass Statue
10.5" X 9.0" X 4.5"
6 kg
23 years in business
23 years in business
Shipped to 153 countries
Shipped to 153 countries
More than 1M+ customers worldwide
More than 1M+ customers worldwide
Fair trade
Fair trade
Free delivery
Free delivery

Sweet notes from the alluring flute echoes nectar from his
        lips.
His restless eyes glance, his head sways, earrings play at his
        cheeks.
My heart recalls Hari here in his love dance,
Playing seductively, laughing, mocking me.

                                                                 --- Gita Govinda.

Krishna here strikes his familiar stance with the right leg crossing the upright left leg. While the left foot is placed flat, only the toes of the right touch the lotus base. This posture is known as the 'svastika,' or auspicious pose. This stance is most commonly associated with Krishna.

The bodies of both Radha and Krishna tilt similarly. This particular posture of the body where the head, torso, and legs slant in contrary directions is known as tribhanga. The legs and hips jutt to the right, the trunk to the left, and the neck and head then again gently to the right. It is a lyrical, dreamy, very graceful pose. The three curves formed by the body symbolize the three worlds, upper, lower and middle, better known in Sanskrit as triloka. This is also popularly known as the posture of three bends.

The divine couple stand on a lotus pedestal, attired in similar dhotis, held in place by elaborate girdles. Radha supports Krishna's flute. Both are heavily bejewelled, being adorned with numerous necklaces, bracelets and anklets. A cow peeps from behind the duo. The cow has been since time immemorial an important auspicious animal in the annals of Indian thought. But surprisingly, its representation has been rare and far between in the art of the subcontinent. The answer lies in the fact that it is not associated with any deity in the form of its vehicle, as compared to the bull of Shiva or eagle of Vishnu. Nonetheless, India being a primarily agricultural economy, this animal is much venerated, and ascribed wish-fulfilling attributes. Indeed the cow is the national animal of Nepal, the world's only Hindu kingdom. Krishna is naturally associated with the cow, he having spent his childhood as an ordinary cowherd in Vrindavan, where he enchanted the cowherdeses of Vrindavan with the sweet sound of his flute.


Free Shipping. Delivered by to all international destinations within 3 to 5 days, fully insured.



Add a review
Have A Question

For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy