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Four-Armed Ekadanta Ganesha

Natural Brass
Antique Brown
Four-Armed Ekadanta Ganesha
$459.00
Color
Item Code: ZDN83
Specifications:
Brass Sculpture
18.4 inch X 14.7 inch X 7.5 inch
11.7 kg
This brass statue, a contemporary art-work but rendered using the ninth-tenth century tradition of the great Chola sculpture, still practised at some of the centres of art in South India, especially Swamimalai in Tamilnadu, best known for its brass-cast in characteristic Chola tradition, represents the four-armed elephant god Lord Ganesha in his Ekadanta manifestation. The Ekadanta form of Lord Ganesha is one of his earliest eight forms that texts perceive as prevailing over eight weaknesses inherent in man. Lord Ganesha in his Ekadanta manifestation commands ‘moda’ – arrogance, the man’s inclination to disrespect others, a kind of non-acceptance of the world, and hence a disharmonious living. By vanquishing this inherent weakness Ekadanta Ganapati makes the life harmonious.

As prescribed for his form as Ekadanta, Lord Ganesha is one-tusked and four-armed. He is carrying in his normal right hand his broken tusk, an essential attribute of his Ekadanta form, while in other three, a goad, noose and ‘modaka’ or ‘laddu’. The broken tusk in his right hand has mythical contexts. It is said that he had written with it the great epic Mahabharata when its author sage Vyasa could not find a scribe to do it. As the tradition has it, he worshipped Lord Ganesha and prayed him to scribe the great epic when he dictated it. Hence, Ekadanta Ganapati is worshipped also as the patron of literature, and not only that in all academic events his worship precedes the worship of Saraswati, the goddess of learning, but an ivory pen, symbolic of his broken tusk with which he had scribed the great epic, is revered as the highest tool of learning.

This seated image of Lord Ganesha has been installed on a four-tiered high pedestal consisting of a rectangular base comprising an upwards tapering lotus moulding, a plain moulding with a projected edge over it, a full blown lotus above it and finally a plain circular moulding on its top. From the backside of the pedestal there radiates an elaborate fire-arch which rises on architectural members looking-like half columns on either side consisting of lotus mouldings and adorned with floral arabesques. Over these half columns rises a circular arch, a plain ring inside and a course of stylised leaves over it. It is topped by a motif having the Kirtimukha’s resemblance. The elaborately bejeweled figure of Lord Ganesha is in ‘lalitasana’ – seated posture. He is putting on an elegant ‘antariya’ with laces of beads alternating its pleats, a low-height crown and a yajnopavit around his belly. In precision, figural grace, craftsmanship, anatomical proportions, finish and overall execution the statue is simply rare.

This description by Prof. P.C. Jain and Dr. Daljeet. Prof. Jain specializes on the aesthetics of literature and is the author of numerous books on Indian art and culture. Dr. Daljeet is the curator of the Miniature Painting Gallery, National Museum, New Delhi. They have both collaborated together on a number of books.


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