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The Majestic Ikat Sarees to uplift even the days of blue

The incredibly colorful and fluffy ikat textiles sustain a significant strain. Their elaborate designs are inspired by a substantial corpus of Central Asian motifs, and their energetic lines and vibrant and diverse utilization of color are grounded in the country's long and vital artistic tradition. Islamic artists made a conscious attempt to capture the arrangement of the cosmos through precise geometry. In contrast to commemorating Islam, the huge mosques in Bukhara and Samarkand decorated in tiles also function as distilling the boundless. Although maybe unintended, such architecture certainly had to have an enduring effect on 19th-century artworks. While the early ikats took somewhat discreetly from geometrical embellishment, future ikats made a deliberate decision to integrate elements explicitly from other crafts. The historic Central Asian tradition was represented in each and every aspect of an ikat's appearance. Numerous ikats feature triangular motifs with teeth-shaped ornaments or dangling elements that are alternatively alluded to as  "amulets." One of the well-known elements of Central Asian rugs' mirror pattern is the "comb" design, which simulates a weft beating instrument. Many ikat patterns have indeed been divided up, scattered, and inverted. Ikats are the product of artists trying to extrapolate significant and powerful motifs to the extent that they are almost incomprehensibly unrecognizable, then combining these patterns in a bewildering array of arrangements. The metaphorical elements of the motif are no longer providing their actual intent in ikat. 


The foundation of India's social heritage, which encompasses not just one but multiple territories, is ikat. It has long connections throughout the nation and countless, distinct, and original branches. Antiquated tales from Odisha, Gujarat, and Telangana are included within the weaves. While Ikat is believed to have originated just on Indonesian islands, India has throughout the years established its very own Ikat weaving techniques. The legacy of Ikat, a rich combination of history and craftsmanship, still seems to be alive and very well today all over the globe. Despite its foundations which traverse the broad spectrum of our country, its underlying basis continues to be the same. The three different types of patterns that help compensate for this weave's foundational pillars are artistic, ecological, and geometrical. Furthermore, every one of these categories draws inspiration from a wide range of sources, such as its geographical location, its native communities, as well as its natural environment. Natural motifs are the designs that draw inspiration from the environment, like flora, wildlife, and everyday phenomena. Geometrical patterns are composed of stripes, checks, chevron, and diamond designs. Abstract patterns are composed of misty waves and patterns in an array of shades.


Various types of Ikat fabric


  1. Patola Ikat: Its double ikat embroidered sari termed a patola is generally composed of silk and is manufactured in Patan, in the Indian state of Gujarat. The solitary word is patolu, whereas the plural is patola. They are incredibly expensive and were formerly restricted to representatives of aristocratic and wealthy households.


  2. Pochampally Ikat: In the Telangana State, Pochampally is an internationally recognized hub for Cotton and Silk Ikat embroidery. Pochampally Ikat fabrics' vivid colors are captivating, but what's even astonishing is the straightforward technique they utilize to create striking geometric flowery, bird, and animal motifs. It is believed that now the art of Ikat embroidery, which demands great precision and expertise, was introduced to Pochampally from Chirala, where it is recognized as chit-ku regionally. They were donned as turbans, lungis, or loincloths and were characterized by their distinctive geometrical motifs in red, black, and white.


FAQS


Q1. What does Ikat denote?


It historically symbolizes power and protection.


Q2. What are the various types of Ikat?


It is of different types- warp ikat, weft ikat, and double ikat.


Ikat or Ikkat is a technique that requires forming patterns in yarn stage and employing tie & dye (resist dyeing) for warp / weft threads. The threads undergo repetitive dyeing process depending on the number of colors in the pattern.


These patterns of dyed threads are skillfully assembled by the artisans into warp sheet or weft sequence. This is then prepared for use on handlooms where they are woven into a fabric by trained IKAT weavers.


Repeat tie & dye process on the yarn makes it necessary to use two ply yarn as a standard raw material in Ikat weaving. Additionally in the design stage, a short length of warp is used for handling convenience.


Use of two ply yarns for Ikat enhances the drape, feel, fullness, comfort and the durability of the woven fabric. All Ikat fabrics are identical on both sides and have the distinct feathered look which makes the fabric truly unique and invaluable.


HOW TO DRAPE A SAREE



STEP 1


Two essential pieces of garments, that go alongwith the Sari, need to be chosen carefully to compliment the Sari. These are:


  • petticoat - which is a waist-to-floor garment, tied tightly at the waist by a drawstring. The petticoat color should match the base sari color as closely as possible. No part of the petticoat, of course, is visible outside the Sari, after having worn it.


  • blouse - which needs to be tight-fitting and whose color needs to be chosen keeping the look of the sari in mind, can be short sleeved or sleeveless, with a variety of necklines. The blouse ends just below the bust.



STEP 2


Start wearing the sari by tucking its plain/upper end into the petticoat, at a position which is a little bit to the right of the navel. Make sure that the lower end of the sari should be touching the floor, and that the whole length of the sari comes on the left-hand side. Now wrap the sari around yourself once, with the sari now coming back in the front, on your right side.



STEP 3


Make about 5 to 7 pleats of equal width of 5 inches, starting at the tucked-in end. Gather the pleats together, neatly, ensuring that the lower edge of the pleats are even and just off the ground and that the pleats fall straight and evenly. A safety pin may be used to stop the pleats from scattering.



STEP 4


Neatly tuck the pleats into the petticoat, at the waist, slightly to the left of the navel, in such a manner that they open to your left.



STEP 5


Drape the remaining fabric around yourself once more left to right, and bring it round your hips to the front, holding the top edge of the sari.



STEP 6


Slightly raise the remaining portion of the Sari on your back, bringing it up under the right arm and over the left shoulder so that the end of the Sari falls to about the level of your knees.


The end portion thus draped, from the left shoulder onwards, is called the Pallav or the Pallu, and can be prevented from slipping off teh shoulder, by fastening it at the shoulder to the blouse with a small safety pin.