For the Benefit of Many
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For the Benefit of Many

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Item Code: NAW216
Author: S.N. Goenka
Publisher: Vipassana Research Institute
Language: English
Edition: 2019
ISBN: 8174142304
Pages: 200
Cover: PAPERBACK
Other Details 10.00 X 6.00 inch
Weight 350 gm
About the Book

Since the early 1980s, there has been an astonishing increase in the number of Vipassana centers in India and around the world. After experiencing efficacy of technique themselves, many old students selflessly contributed in the spread of Vipassana meditation. Working in many different capacities, they have served for the welfare of many.

To ensure that service of these Dhamma servers yield the best results, Goenkaji frequently guided them. At yearly meetings in India or on visits to various centers, he spoke about many different aspects of Dhamma practice and service. The transcripts of those talks and question and answer sessions are the sources of this book. It contains guidance given by Mr. Goenka on practice of Vipassana, what it means to give Dhamma service and how a server ought to serve. This book is ideal for Vipassana meditators.

About the Author

Vipassana is one of India’s most ancient meditation techniques. It was rediscovered around 2500 years ago by Gotama the Buddha. The Principal Teacher of Vipassana, late Mr. S.N. Goenka, was authorised to teach this technique by a respected Vipassana teacher of Burma, Sayagyi U Ba Khin. Born in Burma of Indian heritage, and well established as a businessman and householder,

Mr. S. N. Goenka did his first course under the guidance of Sayagyi in 1955 at the International Meditation Centre in Rangoon. This course was a watershed experience for Mr. S.N. Goenka. In 1969, Goenkaji returned to India and re-introduced this ancient meditation ‘technique to the land of its origin and spread it throughout the World. He inspired the creation of close to 200 centres on six continents, specifically for the practice of Vipassana. All of them are financed solely by voluntary donations and offer the teaching without any charges. Today, the teaching is available in all the world’s major languages, and hundreds of thousands of people join courses every year.

Foreward

Since the early 1980s in India and around the world, there has been an astonishing increase in the number of Vipassana course offered each year and the number of centres devoted to the practice of this teaching. This growth has been possible because of the selfless service of thousands of meditators. Working in many different capacities, they have freely given help so that still more people could take steps on the path of liberation. To ensure that their service yields the best results, over the years Goenkaji has frequently given guidance to all who participate in this work. At yearly meetings in India or on visits to various centres, he has spoken about many different aspects of Dhamma practice and service. The transcripts of those talks and question and answer sessions are the sources for this volume. The material included here covers the years from 1983 to 2000, For the most part it is presented chronologically, but not in every case, one exception, for example, is the talk placed at the end of the book since it provides a fitting and inspiring summation.

In all this mass of material, Goenkaji returns again and again to a central theme: what it means to give Dhamma service and how a server ought to work, He explains this at length but always by presenting a few key points. The first is that service must arise from practice of the Dhamma. Those wishing to help others walk on the path of liberation must be walking on the path themselves: that is, they must maintain a regular daily practice of meditation and strive to observe the Five Precepts as carefully as possible. In fact, Goenkaji says, service is a way of deepening one’s practice by developing the ten paramis.

Secondly, service must spring from a base of metta. Even when servers have to discipline students, they should do so with a volition to help, with a heart filled with goodwill.

Another point is that service must be given selflessly, humbly, without any egotism No-one should think that they are indispensable; no-one should. suppose that service is an opportunity to do things as they want, or to achieve their own aims. Instead, it is an opportunity to set aside one’s own views and become an instrument of the Dhamma.

This is how servers can work together harmoniously. And this is how the Dhamma will continue flourishing in its pristine purity for the good and benefit of many.

Goenkaji discusses these points in depth, as well as numerous other issues, for guidance on a particular issue, the detailed index directs readers to the passages dealing with that topic. In addition, a glossary explains the Pali terms.

For publication purposes the source material has been condensed and edited to some extent, but every effort has been made to maintain Goenkaji’s distinctive voice and faithfully convey his meaning.

If readers have a chance to listen to the original audio taps, they will find them very inspiring. Most of the taps are available for Dhamma servers to listen to between courses at Vipassana centres.

Goenkaji has not himself been able to read through this text, and it may therefore contain some errors and inconsistencies; these are the responsibility of the editors alone. Comments are welcome that might help to rectify any flaws.

May this volume prove useful to those whose service is a vital part of the spread of Dhamma.

**Contents and Sample Pages**








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