20" Antiquated Nataraja In Brass | Handmade | Made In India

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Icons depicting Shiva as the Lord of Dance (Nataraja) seem to have originated in the North in Gupta times, and developed in the South under the post-Gupta Vishnukundin dynasty early in the seventh century. One of the first southern sculptures is a colossal dancing figure carved upon the cliff face above the facade of a cave- temple at Mogallarajapuram on the Krishna river. The Pallavas took up the theme and developed it throughout the succeeding two centuries until, in the tenth century, the Cholas perfected in bronze the form which is the precursor to the present image.

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Item Code: ZJ49
Specifications:
Brass Statue
Height: 21.6 inch
Width: 16.8 inch
Depth: 4.8 inch
Weight: 7.78 kg
Handmade
Handmade
Free delivery
Free delivery
Fully insured
Fully insured
Shipped to 153 countries
Shipped to 153 countries
More than 1M+ customers worldwide
More than 1M+ customers worldwide

To place this icon-type in its context, it is just one of several images, such as the Dakshinamurtis, which depict Shiva-Mahaguru in one of his teaching roles; in this case, as teacher of the classical dance which originated as a magnificent form of worship in temples. The architects and sculptors of the temple having been required to study music and the dance, the sacred building comes to life when the dances are staged, the performers, whose lives are dedicated to the god, being dressed to resemble the deities, demons and heroes of mythology. The god is entertained, his temple resounding with precise rhythms; the dancers themselves, trained from childhood in the strict discipline of their art, may attain a state of ecstasy; and the observers see the gods acting out their timeless dramas in the magical medium of the sacred ballet which recreates the supernatural world of myth.


The Nataraja icon presents the dancer in a pose which is technically termed bhujanga-trasa, 'fear of a snake', since the body is twisted violently to the side, one leg raised abruptly as if the foot had just trodden upon a snake. The left arm sweeping across the body is also a purely artistic movement from the dance. In the upper right hand, is the damaru drum - a double-faced instrument held in the middle at the narrow waist. When the drum is shaken with a vigorous rocking motion, the thongs fly out and the knots or weights lash the stretched skin of the drum faces, producing a rapid, staccato tattoo: the original meaning of the word damaru is a tumultuous clamor or uproar. As for the rest, the icon is wholly didactic, a superb symbol of the divine forces which demand utter self surrender on the part of the individual, presented in ritualized artistic terms which engage the mind of the devotee as compellingly as does the temple-dance itself. This is the four-armed Nataraja image as it is best known; Shiva as the destroyer of ignorance, pattern of the cosmos and guide to liberation.


The Art and Symbolism of Nataraja: Unraveling the Mysteries of Lord Shiva's Cosmic Dance

Lord Shiva appears in the form of Nataraja to perform his divine act of Cosmic dance (Tandava). The word Nataraja denotes 'The King of Dance'. Natya means “dance” and Raja means “king”. The Nataraja form symbolizes the destruction of the universe. The Lord performs Rudra Tandava to destroy the illusion, an evil residing within the hearts of the living beings. The destruction is the end of the cycle of birth and death, and the beginning of spiritual enlightenment of the individual souls misguided by Maya (illusion).

Lord Nataraja wears a serpent coiled around his neck. He holds 'Agni' (fire) in his posterior left hand which signifies the energetic vibrations for the destruction of the world. His anterior left hand takes the shape of Gajahasta (Elephant hand) or Dandahasta, showering his blessings upon his devotees, and extends towards his left leg. There is a snake wrapped in his anterior right arm that represents 'Abhaya' (without any fear). His posterior right hand is carrying a musical instrument 'Damroo', which represents time and rhythm. His whirling hair stands out as a fan behind his head as he performs the divine cosmic dance He is surrounded by a fiery ring 'Prabha Mandala' that represents the material world, full of suffering and pain. Thus, this form of Lord shiva ultimately depicts the destruction of the ignorance of all the spirit souls, showing them the path to liberation.
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What is special about Nataraja?

Nataraja is considered one of the highest forms of Lord Shiva in which he performs the functions of creation, maintenance, and destruction of this material world. Shaivites worship this form of Shiva and take blessings from him to remove all obstacles in their devotional life. His three eyes symbolize an equilibrium of the three modes of material nature namely sattva (mode of goodness), rajas (mode of passion), and tamas (mode of ignorance). The special purpose of his Tandava (transcendental dance) is to release the conditioned souls of this material world from the clutches of Maya which is the external energy of the Supreme Lord Vishnu or Krishna.
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Who is under the feet of Nataraja?

Lord Nataraja stands on a lotus pedestal placing his right foot on the dwarf demon named Apasmara. This demon represents spiritual ignorance and nonsensical speech. According to the Vedic scriptures, ignorance is the greatest enemy and obstacle on the path of self-realization. To preserve knowledge in the world, Apasmara must be subdued to bring about spiritual knowledge or transcendental wisdom. For this purpose, Lord Shiva assumed the form of Nataraja and with his rhythmic movements, he placed his foot on the demon Apasmara and crushed him to death. Thus, signifying that whoever takes the shelter of Nataraja, is freed from ignorance and has his doors open for spiritual advancement.
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Can we keep Nataraja statue at home?

Many people believe that the statue of Nataraja should not be kept and worshiped at home because this form of Lord Shiva is associated with ultimate destruction. They believe that it will only bring about auspiciousness in their lives. However, as discussed earlier, Nataraja's Tandava dance has a deeper meaning. It is the celebration of the destruction of ignorance in the path of self-realization which is in fact the victory of good over evil. Thus, one can surely keep the statue in their home.

How to keep a Brass statue well-maintained?


Brass statues are known and appreciated for their exquisite beauty and luster. The brilliant bright gold appearance of Brass makes it appropriate for casting aesthetic statues and sculptures. Brass is a metal alloy composed mainly of copper and zinc. This chemical composition makes brass a highly durable and corrosion-resistant material. Due to these properties, Brass statues and sculptures can be kept both indoors as well as outdoors. They also last for many decades without losing all their natural shine.

 

Brass statues can withstand even harsh weather conditions very well due to their corrosion-resistance properties. However, maintaining the luster and natural beauty of brass statues is essential if you want to prolong their life and appearance.

 

  • The best and simplest way to maintain a brass statue is to clean it at least twice a week using a soft cloth or cotton rag. This will prevent dust from accumulating on the surface. Dusting is especially important for outdoor statues since it is prone to dust accumulation much more than indoors.

 

  • Another way is to cleanse the statue with mild soap, warm water, and a cotton cloth. You must go to every inch of the statue and even to the crevices and cracks. After this, clean the article with a dry towel to wipe off pools of water left on the surface.

 

  • To give a natural shine and luster to the statue, you may apply coconut or olive oil using cotton on every portion. You can use a toothbrush to get to the small crevices but do not be too harsh. This will make the brass statue appear fresh and new with a polished look.


  • In case you have a colored brass statue, you may apply mustard oil using a soft brush or clean cloth on the brass portion while for the colored portion of the statue, you may use coconut oil with a cotton cloth. 

 

Brass idols of Hindu Gods and Goddesses are especially known for their intricate and detailed work of art. Nepalese sculptures are famous for small brass idols portraying Buddhist deities. These sculptures are beautified with gold gilding and inlay of precious or semi-precious stones. Religious brass statues can be kept at home altars. You can keep a decorative brass statue in your garden or roof to embellish the area and fill it with divinity. 

Frequently Asked Questions
  • Q. Is the statue hollow or solid ?
    A. Brass statues are made through a process of clay casting, hence are hollow. Whereas, panchaloha bronze statues are made through a process of lost wax casting, hence they are solid.
  • Q. Can I see the original photo of the product ?
    A. For original pictures of the statue, kindly email us at [email protected].
  • Q. Can I return the statue ?
    A. All returns must be postmarked within seven (7) days of the delivery date. All returned items must be in new and unused condition, with all original tags and labels attached. To know more please view our return policy.
  • Q. Can you customise the statue for me ?
    A. For any customisation, kindly email us at [email protected].
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