Warning: include(domaintitles/domaintitle_cdn.exoticindia.php3): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 803

Warning: include(): Failed opening 'domaintitles/domaintitle_cdn.exoticindia.php3' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/lib/php:/usr/local/lib/php') in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 803

Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address [email protected].

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Shipping on All Items are Expected in 2-3 Weeks on account of the Coronavirus Pandemic
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Hindu > Simavicarana A Pali Letter on Monastic Boundaries
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Simavicarana A Pali Letter on Monastic Boundaries
Pages from the book
Simavicarana A Pali Letter on Monastic Boundaries
Look Inside the Book
Description
PREFACE

Simavicarana, here superbly edited and introduced to the academic world for the first time by Petra Kieffer-Mulz, is one example of the great wealth of Pali works composed by King Rama IV of Siam (Thailand).

It is generally agreed that Ayutthaya and early Bangkok were not flourishing centres of Pali literary composition compared to the North, where enduring works like Mangalatthadipani, Jinakalamalini, and Camadevivamsa were produced. Ayutthaya does not seem to have produced much beyond a few inscriptions and the Saddhammasangaha, a history of Pali scriptures, unless we are permitted to venture that the various Pali versions of Thai tales that are loosely designated as "Pannasajataka collections" were composed in Central Thailand, since these Pali versions are not found anywhere else. In the early Bangkok period, three rather substantial works were composed by Phra Vimaladhamma: Culayuddhakalavamsa (a history of Ayutthaya), Mahayuddhakalavamsa (a history of the Mon), and Sangitiyavamsa (a history of the Buddhist councils from the first council in India to the ninth council during the reign of King Rama I). All of these works composed in Central Thailand. considered from the point of view of grammar and style, are not without blemishes.

With King Rama IV's earnest research and his sustained efforts to promote Pali grammar and Pali studies, central Siam became the seat of Pali scholarship and literary activity. It is reported that when Rama IV was the abbot of Wat Bovoranives, Pali was used as a spoken language. At that time, Pali was a living language, at least within the walls of the temple.

The Pali works of King Rama IV span a wide range of subjects and genres. He used a variety of metres and he had a very good command of elegant prose. as is evident in the Simc7vicarana. His Pali compositions include prayers, journals, travel accounts, historical works, correspondence. and religious expositions and explanations. All these works demonstrate his skill in handling diverse subjects and literary styles. His expositions and explanations are well researched and abound with references to canonical texts and other treatises as we would expect in modern scholarship.

King Rama IV's Pali oeuvre inspired his contemporaries and students to study and compose in Pali. One of his followers, his own son, Prince Patriarch Vajirananavarorasa, stands out as one of the great successes in Rama IV's efforts to promote Pali scholarship.

The corpus of King Rama IV's Pali works takes up more than two hundred printed pages, or more than five hundred pages together with Thai translations. The corpus has been published several times, most recently in 2004 to celebrate Rama IV's two-hundredth birth anniversary. However, despite the fact that the royal monk was international in outlook, and that works like Sinic7vicarana itself were international in scope, these works are scarcely known to international scholarship - and without a knowledge of these works, the understanding of Thailand's Pali literary heritage may be deemed incomplete.

Petra Kieffer-Pulz has performed a great service to the academic world by editing the Simavicarana and providing it with a thorough introduction and detailed annotations. She has opened a new window into the Pali scholarship of Siam. We hope that her work and fine scholarship will inspire a new generation in the study of the Pali literature of Siam.

INTRODUCTION

The text edited here as Letter 2 (below. pp. 3-47) belongs to the 1 literary category of letters (sandesa) sent to spiritual friends. It is a reply by Thera Vajiranana Makuta Sammata (Deva)vamsa' of Siam (the later King Mon2kut, Rama IV) to Thera Lamkagocda Dhirananda in Sri Lanka. This letter is supplemented by a short letter (Letter 1; below. pp. 1-2) dated to the 5th day of the bright half of the month of Migasira in the year BE 2387/1844 CE: corresponding to December 14th. 1844'. which gives the names of the writer and the recipient, lists the ten presents sent together with the letters and, finally. announces a reply connected with the discussion of ceremonial monastic boundaries (simakatha-patisamyuttam patisc7sanarn). Letter 2 is undated, but quotes the same writer and recipient' and consists of a thorough investigation into the visumgamasima as used in Siam and the neighbouring countries.

Here the information is not given in the way writers and recipients are in general named at the beginning or end of letters, but as the ones responsible for the research paper which follows.

In Letter 2 the writers explain that they want to show their own considerations on the "discussion of boundaries" (simakatha , Letter 2, Se' XXXI; Se' IX) and state that the reply is one that explains the decision with respect to the definitions in the Vinaya"( Vinayalakkhana-vinicchaya-dipakam, Se'-'), or "that explains the definitions in the Vinaya" ( Vinayalakkhana-dipakam, Ce). In verses 6, 73, 80, 81 they call their letter katha. Letter 2 is probably mentioned in another letter by the ten Dhammayuttika monks written to Sobhita Siridhamma at the same time as Letter 1 and 2,5 where it is described as a sasanapanna for Lamkagoda Dhirananda "explaining the definitions of geimasima" (gamasimalakkhanaparidipikam).

The title given to Letter 2 in the introduction to the Siamese edition (Se', pp. ka-dha) and as a heading in Se', i.e., simavicarana, "Investigation on boundaries", is not to be found in the text itself, but seems to be current in Siam.

In the Siamese editions the two letters are thought of as belonging together. The Ceylonese edition prints only Letter 2. In the preface to the Siamese edition (Se'. pp. ka-dha) Prince Damrong Rajanubhap writes that Somdet Phra Sangharaja-chao Krommamuen Jinavarasirivadhana8 obtained them [i.e., the letters] from Sri Lanka, translated them and presented them to the National Library that they might be published when the occasion arose.

In an introduction to these two letters Krommluang Jinavara-sirivadhana Luang Somdet Phra Sangharaja-chao wrote.

**Contents and Sample Pages**





Simavicarana A Pali Letter on Monastic Boundaries

Item Code:
NAT839
Cover:
PAPERBACK
Edition:
2011
ISBN:
9789743503993
Language:
ENGLISH
Size:
8.50 X 5.00 inch
Pages:
99 (Through out Illustrations)
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 0.16 Kg
Price:
$29.00   Shipping Free
Shipping expected in 2 to 3 weeks
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Simavicarana A Pali Letter on Monastic Boundaries

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 245 times since 25th Oct, 2019
PREFACE

Simavicarana, here superbly edited and introduced to the academic world for the first time by Petra Kieffer-Mulz, is one example of the great wealth of Pali works composed by King Rama IV of Siam (Thailand).

It is generally agreed that Ayutthaya and early Bangkok were not flourishing centres of Pali literary composition compared to the North, where enduring works like Mangalatthadipani, Jinakalamalini, and Camadevivamsa were produced. Ayutthaya does not seem to have produced much beyond a few inscriptions and the Saddhammasangaha, a history of Pali scriptures, unless we are permitted to venture that the various Pali versions of Thai tales that are loosely designated as "Pannasajataka collections" were composed in Central Thailand, since these Pali versions are not found anywhere else. In the early Bangkok period, three rather substantial works were composed by Phra Vimaladhamma: Culayuddhakalavamsa (a history of Ayutthaya), Mahayuddhakalavamsa (a history of the Mon), and Sangitiyavamsa (a history of the Buddhist councils from the first council in India to the ninth council during the reign of King Rama I). All of these works composed in Central Thailand. considered from the point of view of grammar and style, are not without blemishes.

With King Rama IV's earnest research and his sustained efforts to promote Pali grammar and Pali studies, central Siam became the seat of Pali scholarship and literary activity. It is reported that when Rama IV was the abbot of Wat Bovoranives, Pali was used as a spoken language. At that time, Pali was a living language, at least within the walls of the temple.

The Pali works of King Rama IV span a wide range of subjects and genres. He used a variety of metres and he had a very good command of elegant prose. as is evident in the Simc7vicarana. His Pali compositions include prayers, journals, travel accounts, historical works, correspondence. and religious expositions and explanations. All these works demonstrate his skill in handling diverse subjects and literary styles. His expositions and explanations are well researched and abound with references to canonical texts and other treatises as we would expect in modern scholarship.

King Rama IV's Pali oeuvre inspired his contemporaries and students to study and compose in Pali. One of his followers, his own son, Prince Patriarch Vajirananavarorasa, stands out as one of the great successes in Rama IV's efforts to promote Pali scholarship.

The corpus of King Rama IV's Pali works takes up more than two hundred printed pages, or more than five hundred pages together with Thai translations. The corpus has been published several times, most recently in 2004 to celebrate Rama IV's two-hundredth birth anniversary. However, despite the fact that the royal monk was international in outlook, and that works like Sinic7vicarana itself were international in scope, these works are scarcely known to international scholarship - and without a knowledge of these works, the understanding of Thailand's Pali literary heritage may be deemed incomplete.

Petra Kieffer-Pulz has performed a great service to the academic world by editing the Simavicarana and providing it with a thorough introduction and detailed annotations. She has opened a new window into the Pali scholarship of Siam. We hope that her work and fine scholarship will inspire a new generation in the study of the Pali literature of Siam.

INTRODUCTION

The text edited here as Letter 2 (below. pp. 3-47) belongs to the 1 literary category of letters (sandesa) sent to spiritual friends. It is a reply by Thera Vajiranana Makuta Sammata (Deva)vamsa' of Siam (the later King Mon2kut, Rama IV) to Thera Lamkagocda Dhirananda in Sri Lanka. This letter is supplemented by a short letter (Letter 1; below. pp. 1-2) dated to the 5th day of the bright half of the month of Migasira in the year BE 2387/1844 CE: corresponding to December 14th. 1844'. which gives the names of the writer and the recipient, lists the ten presents sent together with the letters and, finally. announces a reply connected with the discussion of ceremonial monastic boundaries (simakatha-patisamyuttam patisc7sanarn). Letter 2 is undated, but quotes the same writer and recipient' and consists of a thorough investigation into the visumgamasima as used in Siam and the neighbouring countries.

Here the information is not given in the way writers and recipients are in general named at the beginning or end of letters, but as the ones responsible for the research paper which follows.

In Letter 2 the writers explain that they want to show their own considerations on the "discussion of boundaries" (simakatha , Letter 2, Se' XXXI; Se' IX) and state that the reply is one that explains the decision with respect to the definitions in the Vinaya"( Vinayalakkhana-vinicchaya-dipakam, Se'-'), or "that explains the definitions in the Vinaya" ( Vinayalakkhana-dipakam, Ce). In verses 6, 73, 80, 81 they call their letter katha. Letter 2 is probably mentioned in another letter by the ten Dhammayuttika monks written to Sobhita Siridhamma at the same time as Letter 1 and 2,5 where it is described as a sasanapanna for Lamkagoda Dhirananda "explaining the definitions of geimasima" (gamasimalakkhanaparidipikam).

The title given to Letter 2 in the introduction to the Siamese edition (Se', pp. ka-dha) and as a heading in Se', i.e., simavicarana, "Investigation on boundaries", is not to be found in the text itself, but seems to be current in Siam.

In the Siamese editions the two letters are thought of as belonging together. The Ceylonese edition prints only Letter 2. In the preface to the Siamese edition (Se'. pp. ka-dha) Prince Damrong Rajanubhap writes that Somdet Phra Sangharaja-chao Krommamuen Jinavarasirivadhana8 obtained them [i.e., the letters] from Sri Lanka, translated them and presented them to the National Library that they might be published when the occasion arose.

In an introduction to these two letters Krommluang Jinavara-sirivadhana Luang Somdet Phra Sangharaja-chao wrote.

**Contents and Sample Pages**





Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Simavicarana A Pali Letter on Monastic Boundaries (Hindu | Books)

Karma Sutra (Cracking The Karmic Code)
by Hingori
Paperback (Edition: 2015)
Pali Hills Tourist Hotel Pvt Ltd
Item Code: NAO328
$21.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Mountain of Shiva
Item Code: NAO917
$16.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Panchikarana Vartika
by Dr. Piyali Palit
Hardcover (Edition: 2015)
Maha Bodhi Book Agency
Item Code: NAO837
$23.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Untouchability Alien to Hindu Dharma
by Dr. K.V. Paliwal
Paperback (Edition: 2014)
Suruchi Prakashan
Item Code: NAJ614
$11.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna and Its Relevance
Item Code: NAN306
$57.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Cultural Heritage of India (Set of 9 Volumes)
Item Code: NAF605
$450.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
A History of Indian Literature  (Set of 3 Volumes)
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: NAO564
$95.00$76.00
You save: $19.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
A Comparative Study of Jainism and Buddhism
by SITAL PRASAD
Paperback (Edition: 2003)
Sri Satguru Publications
Item Code: IDF519
$28.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Early Buddhism and The Bhagavadgita
Item Code: NAE293
$35.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Lectures on Vedic Language - A Rare Book
by B.B. Chaubey
Hardcover (Edition: 2005)
Katyayan Vaidik Sahitya Prakashan
Item Code: NAE410
$21.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Bhagavad Gita
Paperback (Edition: 1962)
Penguin Books India
Item Code: IHL371
$11.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
I have received my parcel from postman. Very good service. So, Once again heartfully thank you so much to Exotic India.
Parag, India
My previous purchasing order has safely arrived. I'm impressed. My trust and confidence in your business still firmly, highly maintained. I've now become your regular customer, and looking forward to ordering some more in the near future.
Chamras, Thailand
Excellent website with vast variety of goods to view and purchase, especially Books and Idols of Hindu Deities are amongst my favourite. Have purchased many items over the years from you with great expectation and pleasure and received them promptly as advertised. A Great admirer of goods on sale on your website, will definately return to purchase further items in future. Thank you Exotic India.
Ani, UK
Thank you for such wonderful books on the Divine.
Stevie, USA
I have bought several exquisite sculptures from Exotic India, and I have never been disappointed. I am looking forward to adding this unusual cobra to my collection.
Janice, USA
My statues arrived today ….they are beautiful. Time has stopped in my home since I have unwrapped them!! I look forward to continuing our relationship and adding more beauty and divinity to my home.
Joseph, USA
I recently received a book I ordered from you that I could not find anywhere else. Thank you very much for being such a great resource and for your remarkably fast shipping/delivery.
Prof. Adam, USA
Thank you for your expertise in shipping as none of my Buddhas have been damaged and they are beautiful.
Roberta, Australia
Very organized & easy to find a product website! I have bought item here in the past & am very satisfied! Thank you!
Suzanne, USA
This is a very nicely-done website and shopping for my 'Ashtavakra Gita' (a Bangla one, no less) was easy. Thanks!
Shurjendu, USA
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2020 © Exotic India