14" Sheshasayi Vishnu with Lakshmi In Brass | Handmade | Made In India

$475
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This magnificent brass-statue represents Lord Vishnu reclining over the coils of the great serpent Shesh against a moderately sized golden bolster, and his consort Lakshmi, seated holding his feet and massaging them. The figures of Lord Vishnu and Lakshmi, as also the bolster he is reclining against, are glistening like gold in compliance with the glowing serpent body– the great serpent’s natural body colour and the colour of the earth that Shesh incarnates. The great serpent has coiled under Lord Vishnu’s figure like a cushion elevated to a bed’s height.

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Item Code: ZAI88
Specifications:
Brass Statue
Height: 9.7 inch
Width: 14.2 inch
Depth: 6.2 inch
Weight: 8.15 kg
Handmade
Handmade
Free delivery
Free delivery
Fully insured
Fully insured
Shipped to 153 countries
Shipped to 153 countries
More than 1M+ customers worldwide
More than 1M+ customers worldwide

The artist conceiving the statue has designed the coiling serpent like an artistic couch – narrow towards the feet, and wider towards the head – a conch-like appearance, one of Lord Vishnu’s initial and essential attributes. Besides, the great serpent Shesh has canopy-like held its seven-hooded head over Lord Vishnu’s head. In Indian iconographic tradition this form of his image is known variously as Sheshasayi, Sheshasana, Shesh-shayana and Shayana-murti. The Narayan Upanishad – one from the group of minor Upanishads, classes this form as the most accomplished and calls it Narayan.



For public worship or private, or even for its aesthetics, the Vaishnava Murtishilpashashtra – iconography of Vaishnava images, as well as the Vaishnava tradition of sacred images, prescribes three classes of images of Lord Vishnu. These are seated, standing and reclining. Seated images are in ‘yoga-mudra’ – yogic posture and are known as Yoga-murti. Though Lord Vishnu is considered as one of the Adi-gurus – founding teachers of Yoga, his images in ‘yogasana’ – yogic posture, are very rare. One of his better known seated images enshrines the sanctum of the sacred pilgrimage seat at Badarinath in Himalayan hill range. His standing images are more common and reported from the 2nd-3rd century AD itself. However, Lord Vishnu’s more characteristic and ultimate image-form is one as reclining on the coils of the great serpent Shesh. This image form – the reclining one, is his final icon to emerge after the other two. One of its early and brilliant examples, datable to sixth century, is seen in Dasavatara temple of Gupta period at Deogarh in Lalitpur district of Uttar Pradesh. 



Each of these three classes of images has its own symbolic dimensions and significance the breadth of Shayana-murti being the widest. Yoga-murti Vishnu explores within – an attempt at knowing who he is – the initial state of his being. As the Devi-Bhagavata has it, after the Great Deluge, a child Vishnu emerged floating on a fig-leaf asking the void, ‘who he was’, and then a voice – the Great Goddess, disclosed to him as to who he was and what for he had emerged. The standing position suggests act, his readiness to command, to protect or punish – a monarch’s role. Exploration within and an act beyond are timed for time scales every act whoever performs it; presence – ‘vyapti’ that is Lord Vishnu who is Vishnu by being ‘vyapta’, is beyond time. Shayana-murti is the timeless presence that pervades the entire cosmos timelessly. The great serpent Shesh stands for entire Creation and Shayana-murti pervades both, the body of the great serpent, and the Creation that the great serpent manifests. Here Lakshmi – riches, prosperity, fertility, abundance, as also beauty and grace that Lakshmi manifests, serves him incessant.



In exact adherence to the tradition of Vaishnava images, this four-armed image of Vishnu carrying all characteristic attributes : ‘chakra’ – disc, ‘shankha’ – conch, ‘gada’ – mace, and ‘padma’ – lotus, in his hands, is rare in plasticity, modeling and anatomical proportions. It abounds on one hand in a king’s splendour, and on the other, in a woman’s grace. Unlike instruments of war disc, conch and mace are merely symbolic as if included for revealing his identity. Whatever the myths in regard to his exploits against demons, on his face there enshrines only divine quiescence, and in his entire being, great benevolence. He has sharp features, three-fourth shut lotus-eyes, bold eye-brows, a well-defined forehead and round face with pointed chin, all modeled after best of iconographic traditions. Not in blue, the mythical colour of his body, the artist has conceived his figure in glistening gold. Though elaborately bejeweled and richly costumed, the figure of Lakshmi has been modeled like an humble wife incessantly engaged in serving her lord.

Unveiling the Divine: Exploring the Symbolism and Significance of Lakshmi

Lakshmi Devi is one of the principal Goddesses in Hinduism. In the Vaishnava tradition, especially the Sri Vaishnava Sampradaya, Vishnu and Lakshmi are considered the Supreme or Absolute Truth. Mother Lakshmi is known as the Goddess of fortune who blesses the living entities in the material world with material wealth and prosperity. Our Vedic scriptures mention that Lakshmi Ji is the eternal consort of Lord Vishnu who is the Supreme Personality of Godhead. He maintains and controls everything in the material and spiritual world. Goddess Lakshmi is also His internal potency and is thus always engaged in the loving devotional service of the Lord in His spiritual abode Vaikuntha, a place where there is no misery.

The transcendental form of Mother Lakshmi is extremely beautiful. She is the emblem of beauty and mercy. She sees every individual soul as her own child and whoever approaches her with faith and devotion, certainly gets the mercy of Lakshmi Devi. She is often depicted wearing a red saree and holding different items in her four arms. She holds a lotus flower in each of her two upper arms. With one of her lower hands, she holds a pot full of gold coins (representing wealth) while the other hand stays in a mudra that signifies charity.
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Can we keep a Lakshmi statue at home?

As stated earlier, Lakshmi Ji bestows good fortune upon her devotees and takes care of them. She is full of compassion and therefore accepts anyone who comes to her even with ulterior motives. However, she not only gives material wealth to her devotees but those who approach her to know the real goal of human life or to know about the Absolute Truth, she blesses them with spiritual wealth (wisdom and mercy) by which they can come to a higher platform and consciousness. Thus, it is only by the mercy of Goddess Lakshmi that a living entity starts its spiritual journey toward Lord Vishnu.

If you want to attract this special mercy, you can keep the deity of Goddess Lakshmi at your home and worship her every day with an attitude of surrender. By doing so, you will develop a personal relationship with her and you will be able to experience transcendental happiness.
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Which Lakshmi idol is good for home?

Lakshmi Devi expands herself into eight major forms (Ashta Lakshmi) that are Dhana Lakshmi, Dhanya Lakshmi, Gaja Lakshmi, Sanatana Lakshmi, Dhairya Lakshmi, Vijaya Lakshmi, Vidya Lakshmi, and Aishwarya Lakshmi. You can keep any of the forms of Lakshmi in your home to bring material and spiritual auspiciousness. However, if you want her ultimate mercy, you may keep the deity of Goddess Lakshmi along with her master, Lord Vishnu.
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Which material is good for Lakshmi idol?

The idol or deity of Goddess Lakshmi comes in various materials such as brass, wood, marble, copper, bronze, etc. If you are planning to keep a deity of Lakshmi Devi at your home, the best material would be either brass or marble. Brass is known for its exquisite appearance resembling gold and is also a strong material. Marble is preferred by most people because it lasts longer than any other material.

How to keep a Brass statue well-maintained?


Brass statues are known and appreciated for their exquisite beauty and luster. The brilliant bright gold appearance of Brass makes it appropriate for casting aesthetic statues and sculptures. Brass is a metal alloy composed mainly of copper and zinc. This chemical composition makes brass a highly durable and corrosion-resistant material. Due to these properties, Brass statues and sculptures can be kept both indoors as well as outdoors. They also last for many decades without losing all their natural shine.

 

Brass statues can withstand even harsh weather conditions very well due to their corrosion-resistance properties. However, maintaining the luster and natural beauty of brass statues is essential if you want to prolong their life and appearance.

 

  • The best and simplest way to maintain a brass statue is to clean it at least twice a week using a soft cloth or cotton rag. This will prevent dust from accumulating on the surface. Dusting is especially important for outdoor statues since it is prone to dust accumulation much more than indoors.

 

  • Another way is to cleanse the statue with mild soap, warm water, and a cotton cloth. You must go to every inch of the statue and even to the crevices and cracks. After this, clean the article with a dry towel to wipe off pools of water left on the surface.

 

  • To give a natural shine and luster to the statue, you may apply coconut or olive oil using cotton on every portion. You can use a toothbrush to get to the small crevices but do not be too harsh. This will make the brass statue appear fresh and new with a polished look.


  • In case you have a colored brass statue, you may apply mustard oil using a soft brush or clean cloth on the brass portion while for the colored portion of the statue, you may use coconut oil with a cotton cloth. 

 

Brass idols of Hindu Gods and Goddesses are especially known for their intricate and detailed work of art. Nepalese sculptures are famous for small brass idols portraying Buddhist deities. These sculptures are beautified with gold gilding and inlay of precious or semi-precious stones. Religious brass statues can be kept at home altars. You can keep a decorative brass statue in your garden or roof to embellish the area and fill it with divinity. 

Frequently Asked Questions
  • Q. Is the statue hollow or solid ?
    A. Brass statues are made through a process of clay casting, hence are hollow. Whereas, panchaloha bronze statues are made through a process of lost wax casting, hence they are solid.
  • Q. Can I see the original photo of the product ?
    A. For original pictures of the statue, kindly email us at [email protected].
  • Q. Can I return the statue ?
    A. All returns must be postmarked within seven (7) days of the delivery date. All returned items must be in new and unused condition, with all original tags and labels attached. To know more please view our return policy.
  • Q. Can you customise the statue for me ?
    A. For any customisation, kindly email us at [email protected].
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