Indian Cocoa
Indian Cocoa
Natural Brass
Natural Brass

51" The Welcoming Deepalakshmi In Brass | Handmade | Made In India

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$2440

This exceptionally ornate brass statue, sublimity enshrining the face of the represented figure, and rhythm, wreathed into her form – into every curve and gesture of her parts, an icon usually classed as Deepalakshmi in Indian iconographic tradition, represents a young woman holding in her hands a large lamp

Indian Cocoa
Indian Cocoa
Natural Brass
Natural Brass
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Item Code: ZDQ74
Specifications:
Brass Statue
Height: 51.50 inch
Width: 16.50 inch
Depth: 16.50 inch
Weight: 44.38 kg
Handmade
Handmade
Free delivery
Free delivery
Fully insured
Fully insured
Shipped to 153 countries
Shipped to 153 countries
More than 1M+ customers worldwide
More than 1M+ customers worldwide

In ancient and medieval India, and even till recent times, transporting light in the form of lit lamps was a regular activity performed invariably by women, a maid or a household, at a palace or a hut. Held close to the bosom and often protected from winds by a part of one’s ensemble the light centring and reflecting on the face of the courier always multiplied its glow : the sensuous beauty of the young spouse and the divine aura on the mother’s face. A local version of Rama-katha alludes to Anasuya, the wife of the known sage Atri, emerging from her hut with a lit lamp in hands when around the evening Rama, Sita and Lakshmana reach Atri’s hermitage. The tradition contends that the light that Sita saw reflecting in the divine eyes of mother Anasuya was Sita’s light for ever and whenever she recalled it, darkness illuminated with light.


Obviously, in Indian context light always had divine dimensions, and even when its courier was a maid possessed of sensuous beauty, she was seen as having an amount of divinity as had an enlightening goddess and commanded respect. Sculptures of a lamp-carrying maiden begin appearing quite early, however, her classification as a goddess, especially as a form of Lakshmi who was associated with Diwali, the festival of light, since long before, is datable to around the first half of the seventeenth century. These statues of lamps’ carrying young women were initially used as articles of gift made to relatives, superiors and friends, a tradition which emerged first in South, perhaps at Vijayanagar. Later, it was widely followed all over the land. Deepalakshmi has been ever since a cultural icon that harbours light, keeps it up, and promotes all that light promotes. Far ahead of the Western concept of ‘torch-bearer’ – the guide or the mentor – an intellectual being, in Indian tradition the courier of lamp was seen as a divine presence that lighted the path by its mere presence. It was for such reasons that statues of a woman carrying lamp in her hands were often seen posted on the entrances to temples, palaces, mansions or houses. These Deepalakshmi statues, a name they subsequently acquired, presented a strange blend of spiritualism and secularism. They manifested divinity but not linked to a sectarian line they were completely secular, and hence, adorned any door, or any sitting chamber, even an Islamic or Christian ruler’s, by their sheer aesthetic beauty and inspired by their power to spread light. Now for over three hundred years a Deepalakshmi statue is one of the most auspicious object in any house, and as significant an image for Diwali worship as Goddess Lakshmi herself. This brilliantly conceived brass-cast is outstanding in the figural quality of the image, in its modeling, plasticity, grace, divine aura and iconographic details : round face with sharp nose, rounded cheeks with cute lips socketed within and deep thoughtful eyes arching over, a large bead-like moulded chin and a blissful composure on the face. As absolute is the figure’s anatomy consisting of a well defined neck, sensuously moulded breasts, subdued belly, broad shoulders, voluminous hips twisted to right that adds to the part greater volume, and a proportionate height.


Wearing a towering Vaishnava crown, ‘makara-kundalas’ – ear-ornaments designed like crocodiles, broad necklaces, elaborate waist-band and armlets conceived with two peacock motifs, strange and delightful, as a pair of the dancing bird is perching over shoulder-joints. An auspicious icon peacocks enhance the image’s auspicious influence. Elegantly pleated and embellished ‘antariya’ – lower garment, is another exceptionally artistic element of the figure. 

How to keep a Brass statue well-maintained?


Brass statues are known and appreciated for their exquisite beauty and luster. The brilliant bright gold appearance of Brass makes it appropriate for casting aesthetic statues and sculptures. Brass is a metal alloy composed mainly of copper and zinc. This chemical composition makes brass a highly durable and corrosion-resistant material. Due to these properties, Brass statues and sculptures can be kept both indoors as well as outdoors. They also last for many decades without losing all their natural shine.

 

Brass statues can withstand even harsh weather conditions very well due to their corrosion-resistance properties. However, maintaining the luster and natural beauty of brass statues is essential if you want to prolong their life and appearance.

 

  • The best and simplest way to maintain a brass statue is to clean it at least twice a week using a soft cloth or cotton rag. This will prevent dust from accumulating on the surface. Dusting is especially important for outdoor statues since it is prone to dust accumulation much more than indoors.

 

  • Another way is to cleanse the statue with mild soap, warm water, and a cotton cloth. You must go to every inch of the statue and even to the crevices and cracks. After this, clean the article with a dry towel to wipe off pools of water left on the surface.

 

  • To give a natural shine and luster to the statue, you may apply coconut or olive oil using cotton on every portion. You can use a toothbrush to get to the small crevices but do not be too harsh. This will make the brass statue appear fresh and new with a polished look.


  • In case you have a colored brass statue, you may apply mustard oil using a soft brush or clean cloth on the brass portion while for the colored portion of the statue, you may use coconut oil with a cotton cloth. 

 

The Power of Light: Understanding the Role of Oil Lamps in Hinduism

Hinduism is a boon to human society for it guides everyone to follow their Dharma and rise above the material concept of life. Hinduism is also known as “Sanatan Dharma”. These are Sanskrit terms in which Sanatan means “eternal” and Dharma means “Intrinsic nature or occupation”. Thus it deals with the intrinsic nature or the real identity of the living entities; that which can never be taken away from them. The principles of Hinduism are given in the Vedic literature or scriptures that are considered “Apaurusheya”; they have not been written by any ordinary person but have been compiled by Vyasadev, the literary incarnation of the Supreme Lord Krishna. The word “Veda” means complete knowledge, both material and spiritual. The knowledge in Vedic literature is so vast and precise that if one looks carefully, he will notice that nothing is sentimental or imaginary but is based on facts and truth. There is a clear description and information about the identity of all living beings, the nature of the Absolute Truth, the reason for the existence of this world, the information about the world beyond this universe, and the relationship between us and God, the Absolute Truth.

Why do we light a lamp?

There are many rituals recommended in the Vedas for engaging our body and mind in the service of God. One of them is the lighting of ghee or oil lamps before the deity. According to the Vedic injunctions, all auspicious functions begin with lighting a lamp. It has a great spiritual significance. It is believed that the light of the lamp symbolizes “knowledge”, the wick symbolizes the false ego of the living entity, and ghee (clarified butter) or oil symbolizes all the negative tendencies (Anarthas) accumulated in the heart such as greed, lust, anger, and envy. When the lamp is lit by spiritual knowledge, all the Anarthas are exhausted, and the false ego, which is the root cause of conditional life, is also burnt. Therefore, the lamp is lit before the Lord as a sacrifice of our false ego in His service. Just as the light of the lamp dissipates all darkness, similarly, the light of knowledge dissipates ignorance of the Jivas and enables us to realize our real identity and purpose of life.
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Why only an oil or ghee lamp?

One may question why only an oil lamp is lit before the Lord and why not an artificial light source. This may sound logical but lighting a lamp has a further spiritual significance. The flame of the light in a lamp always burns upwards indicating that by cultivating spiritual knowledge, one achieves the highest perfection of life and is always victorious. Also, a traditional lamp is the purest form of offering.
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In almost every house of a follower of Sanatan Dharma, an oil or ghee lamp is lit before the altar of the Lord or before the Tulsi plant. Some people light it at dawn, some at dusk, and some people prefer to light it at dawn and dusk. Either ghee or sesame oil can be used to burn the wick. Vaishnavas (devotees of Lord Vishnu or Krishna) especially light a ghee lamp every day in the month of Kartik to offer their love and devotion to the Lord.
Frequently Asked Questions
  • Q. Is the statue hollow or solid ?
    A. Brass statues are made through a process of clay casting, hence are hollow. Whereas, panchaloha bronze statues are made through a process of lost wax casting, hence they are solid.
  • Q. Can I see the original photo of the product ?
    A. For original pictures of the statue, kindly email us at [email protected].
  • Q. Can I return the statue ?
    A. All returns must be postmarked within seven (7) days of the delivery date. All returned items must be in new and unused condition, with all original tags and labels attached. To know more please view our return policy.
  • Q. Can you customise the statue for me ?
    A. For any customisation, kindly email us at [email protected].
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