Warning: include(domaintitles/domaintitle_cdn.exoticindia.php3): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 772

Warning: include(): Failed opening 'domaintitles/domaintitle_cdn.exoticindia.php3' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/lib/php:/usr/local/lib/php') in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 772

Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address [email protected].

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
The Gaze Of Mother Kali

The Gaze Of Mother Kali

When one thinks of Devi Kali, a wrathful image occurs in the mind's eye. Inky black skin, flaming tresses, a bloodthirsty stance. She vanquishes adharm like no other deity of the Hindu pantheon, and looks the part. In this oil painting, however, we see a different side of Kali Mata. Dusky and dashabhujadhari (ten-armed) indeed, She is dressed here like the peaceful Hindu devis, which is quite unlike Her given the nakedness that is associated with Her fearsome iconography. Her form is clad in an abundance of statement gold jewellery, including the sturdy hands that wield all those weapons. This roopa of the Kali Mata exudes a balance between calm and wrath like no other work of art.

The cool blue of Her skin, as well as the blue of the background, is set off by the huge flame that is Her halo. From beneath the crown comes a gaze that could only be described as sthirasnigdha (Sanskrit word used to convey stability and calm), despite the signature determination and ferocity that one cannot overlook. Her form, including that cascade of black tresses and the rest of Her beauteous features, is divine and maternal. Her gaze is directed at the devotee, like the mother's to Her child - that gaze will shield the dharmee from adharm, and burn down the adharm in the adharmee. This unusual Kali Devi oil is proof that the svaroopa of the Mother lies primarily in Her eyes.

Post a comment +
Post
Five-Strand Kundan Jadau Choker With Black Gem Drops, Statement Pendant, And Matching Danglers

Five-Strand Kundan Jadau Choker With Black Gem Drops, Statement Pendant, And Matching Danglers

Nothing like a statement kundan set to set off an ethnic outfit. Kundan jadau work has a place amongst the oldest, and the most beautiful, of traditional Indian jewellery. It is characterised by slivers of gold foil placed between the gems employed in the piece and their mount. This one is a fine example of this style, a five-stranded choker made of glassy silver gems and a row of shining black drops. One could see a lot of gold betwixt the profusion of gemstones, the colour of the copper alloy from which this set has been fashioned. Zoom in on the same to gauge for yourself the high-precision jadau that is the hallmark of Indian kundan handiwork.

The statement pendant completes the beauty of the chunky choker. A mass of more of those matching silver gems, punctuated with copper gold and lined with a miniscule row of black drops. Similar drop gems characterise the accompanying danglers. Note the preceding gold-coloured, silver gem-studded temple-like structures that add to the traditional ethnic appeal of the whole set. The rest of the danglers comprise of tinier versions of the same black and silver gemstones, arranged to form a petal motif before the drop and vine-and-drops throughout. Teamed with a neutral coloured evening saree, this kundan necklace set would make you feel like a queen at gatherings with a traditional spin.

Post a comment +
Post
Beetroot-Purple Bridal Anarkali Suit with Crewel Embroidered Bolero Jacket

Beetroot-Purple Bridal Anarkali Suit with Crewel Embroidered Bolero Jacket

This four-piece suit would be a superbly feminine addition to your wardrobe. A rich pink colour set off by glittering silver embroidery, classic Anarkali cut that makes for an irresistible silhouette, and clinging chiffon as the foundation fabric, which together make for a buy you cannot go wrong with. The skirt is long and flowing and gorgeous - layers upon layers of rustling chiffon flirtatiousness - and the fitted bust that complements it comes with a rim of luxuriant embroidery at the waist, cinching it in place. Matching pink choodidar trousers complete this Anarkali suit.

What sets this apart from your run-of-the-mill evening suits is the pink jacket it comes with. Long-sleeved, front-open, almost kissing the hem of the kameez itself, it is superimposed with silver crewel-embroidery that would glitter as you motion. With that being the centre of attention of the whole dress, the dupatta has been kept relatively simple and fuss-free. It is a length of translucent pink chiffon that you may effortlessly throw over the shoulder such as not to block the statement-making jacket from view. Wear this on an evening do with some chunky, youthful silver pieces, and this suit would make you the talk of the town for some time to come.

Post a comment +
Post
The Glamour Of Tribhanga Uma

The Glamour Of Tribhanga Uma

A swaying sense of motion, a heightened awareness of deviroopa. This Swamimalai bronze conveys a universe of sensuousness and divinity. Handpicked from the recesses of the South, the home of the Indian bronze tradition, this sculpture captures as much of Devi Uma's beauty and presence as is humanely possible. She is tall and lissome, the characteristic tribhang (the spinal column of Her body breaks - 'bhang' - at three - 'tri' - places) of Her stance exuding elegance and stateliness. She is wife to none other than Shiva, and Her gaze onto the world is laced with fearlessness and wisdom. Note how well the sharp lines of Her shringar go with Her superbly defined proportions.

The iconography of Shiva's wife is replete in this independent Devi Uma composition. The crown that towers above Her head has been sculpted with superb detail, and adds to Her gorgeous stature. Her countenance and the features that grace it are full and lotus-like, a signature of contemporary Chola-style bronzes. Long, vine-like kundalas and a bunch of necklaces complement the dhoti of thin silk that reveals rather than conceals Her yogic musculature. The pedestal is an important aspect of Indian religious sculptures. This one comprises of multiple tiers of lotuses of downward ascending surface area. Indeed this work of superfine art is fit to be consecrated and housed in a temple in your space.

Post a comment +
Post
The Bride's Unhappiness

The Bride's Unhappiness

A rustic newlywed sits within the cool precincts of her mud home. It is the height of summer, and she has just emerged from her bath. She has draped the white and gold-bordered saree only partially on her barely dried body, probably owing to the heat. She was in the middle of her shringar, and had just put on a clutch of necklaces and some studs on her lobes when she must have remembered the basket of fruits. Yet to put on the all-important sindoor, she swept up the fruits as she glided across the courtyard. As she entered the kitchen, she was struck by the strangeness of her surroundings. She paused and sat down on the nearest stool, staring out into the distance.

This lifelike oil captures the essence of bridal sorrow, an unhappiness so ungovernable that dharm has assigned it to be borne by the woman. The figure you see in this painting is of a nubile woman, married off by her parents into probably a village like theirs some distance away. Her mouth is pursed; pensiveness, writ large on her beauteous brow. For probably the first time amidst the bustle of her new duties, she has had a moment to herself. How far away she is from everything she has ever know or that has made her who she is. She is glowing in the quiet afternoon light that has stolen into the kitchen. Any moment now the turmoil within her would come out in a torrent of womanly tears.

Post a comment +
Post
Aspen-Gold Banarasi Sari with Woven Bootis and Brocaded Pallu

Aspen-Gold Banarasi Sari with Woven Bootis and Brocaded Pallu

Figured silks of Banaras are the most sumptuous of sarees. Every Indian woman dreams of getting wedded in one; and given the beauty and splendour of these statement-making silks, it is no wonder why. The saree you see on this page is a wearable work of art. It is fashioned from pure homegrown silk and given the signature colour of spring, a vibrant shimmering yellow. It takes weeks and months of painstakingly executed skill and labour to put together a single, unique Banarasi saree, and this brocaded number is no exception.

While Banarasis have traditionally been made on endemic naksha drawlooms, it is now jacquard equipment that produces the characteristic weave. The exquisite yellow of the foundation is superimposed with booties of red thread and pale gold brocade. More of that brocade could be found on the border and at the edge of the endpiece, a superbly intricate weave done in a gracious tone that complements the base colour of the saree. Wear this on the choicest of ritual gatherings to turn the maximum number of heads.

Post a comment +
Post
Coloured Glass- And Pearl-Embellished Danglers (South Indian Temple Jewellery)

Coloured Glass- And Pearl-Embellished Danglers (South Indian Temple Jewellery)

South Indian temple jewellery is among the finest of Indian-made jewellery. They are made by select artisans who specialise in making these pieces. This kind of jewellery is designed to grace idols installed in the magnificent temples of the South, hence the their name in Indian parlance. This pair of gold-coloured sterling silver danglers betrays the highly distinctive style of South Indian temple jewellery. The work is intricate and perfectly symmetrical; the embellishments are of the finest quality; and it has been made with a great deal of love and devotion to the idea of the devi.

Indeed, these danglers would make you look like a Hindu devi Herself (in Hindu dharm, every woman is considered a svaroopa of the devi). Teamed with a South Indian-style pooja saree that come with thick gold borders, these danglers would look great at a gathering with a traditional spin. Zoom in on the work to appreciate the precision with which this rare skill has been executed - the statement lattice-work, the gorgeous leaf- and petal-motifs, and the richly coloured glass gems that have been used to complete the work. Do not miss the super-miniscule pearls at the absolute bottom of the danglers.

Post a comment +
Post
Devi Bhadrakali, Worshipped By Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva, And Indra (Tantric Devi Series)

Devi Bhadrakali, Worshipped By Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva, And Indra (Tantric Devi Series)

Devi Bhadrakali is the embodiment of all that is celebrated and revered in Hindu devis. She is the supreme entity of the Shakti sect, and wife to Veerbhadra Himself. According to the Devi Bhagavata Purana, She is the one originally responsible for the dharmic cycle of creation, preservation, and destruction that pervades the whole universe. In this Basholi-style watercolour by Kailash Raj, She is depicted with the supreme devas of the Hindu pantheon in homage before Her. Her form is dusky and dynamic, as given away by the raised ankle. In Her anterior hands She holds a musical instrument; in the posterior ones, libations of blood and wine in a basin and a goblet. In Her flowing pink and purple silks and pearls-and-gold shringar, Devi Bhadrakali is replete with everything that makes the quintessential Hindu Devi what She is - beautiful, wrathful as given away by Her statement complexion, and a divine proficient.

Amidst the sun-bathed moors, the rulers of svargaloka stand before the powerful Devi with their hands folded in namaskaram. Brahma, the chaturmukha and the chaturbhuja (a kamandalu and the pothi in the posterior hands), is followed by Vishnu whose complexion gives away His Krishna avatara, Shiva in His signature loincloth and the naga wound around His neck, and finally Indra with a thousand eyes on His skin. Apart from Shiva's moon-trimmed jatamukuta, the studded gold crowns sprouting blooming pink lotuses of the entities in this watercolour are characteristic of Basholi paintings.

Post a comment +
Post
Tibetan Buddhist Ritual Kettle Embossed With Four Harmonious Brothers (Made In Nepal)

Tibetan Buddhist Ritual Kettle Embossed With Four Harmonious Brothers (Made In Nepal)

The boiling kettle is a simple item, so thoroughly annealed into our lives that one could not possibly give it any meaning beyond its utilitarian role. As everyday and easy to overlook as it is, it has been written about in great detail in the tripithakas. When the whistle blows, it takes one aback by the senses; one naturally realises that is time to take it off the fire, and the moment this action is performed, it is like nothing ever happened. Somewhere in the Buddhist texts, they say that the whistling kettle is akin to the anger in us (or restlessness, jealousy, any emotion that induces unease in the mind), and that these emotions are triggers for us to take some action. They take us aback by the soul, and giving in to them would be akin to letting the jarring sound of the kettle's whistle go on and on whilst trying to otherwise live our lives.

The symbolic kettle that you see on this page is therefore more than a work of art. It is sculpted from copper and gilded with gold and silver, with a finesse that is the hallmark of Nepalese workmanship. Embossed on the surface are images with a spiritual significance in Tibetan Buddhism, such as the four harmonious brothers. However, there is more to this buy than just the irresistible aesthetics. The kettle conveys the lesson that through anger, your mind is indicating to you that something needs to be done. You need to take control of the situation that angers you instead of venting it and doing away with whatever harmony that is left. Like taking the kettle off the fire, that decisive action - if it is the right one - would satiate your anger such that you would no longer suffer from it.

Post a comment +
Post
Bamboo-Yellow Phulkari Embroidered Dupatta from Punjab with Sequins

Bamboo-Yellow Phulkari Embroidered Dupatta from Punjab with Sequins

Phulkari ('phul' means 'flower' in the vernacular, while 'kari' means 'embroidery') plays a very important role in the life of a Punjabi lady. She is given one by her grandmother at the time of her birth; wears one during the all-important phere ( as an integral part of her trousseau); and wears one when she steps out for the first time after becoming a mother. The dupatta that you see on this page is more than a fashionable odhni that would merely look great at a party or a pooja. It is a slice of history, a work of folk art that you could wear. From the vibrant colours of the phulkari to the sequins that punctuate the embroidery, this one is a characteristically cheerful number.

Traditionally phulkaris were not commercially produced. They were the domain of women who made these wonderful textiles at home for the daughters and other women of the subsequent generation. It is no wonder then if this gorgeous dupatta, should you decide to buy this, becomes a precious hand-me-down in your family. It is long and luscious, decidedly youthful in its appeal, and fashionable in a way that will not fall out of trend. An ethnic classic, this piece of folk fashion would more of an investment in your wardrobe.

Post a comment +
Post
«     Previous     2   3   4   5   6   7     Next     »
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Share with friends
Related Items
Goloka -Nag Champa Agarbathi (Pack 12 Packets)
Goloka -Nag Champa Agarbathi (Pack 12 Packets)
Goloka
$35.00
Goloka -Nag Champa Agarbathi (Pack 12 Packets)
Studies in Rgveda and Modern Sanskrit Literature
Studies in Rgveda and Modern Sanskrit Literature
Hardcover
S. Ranganath
$25.00
Studies in Rgveda and Modern Sanskrit Literature
Selfless Action - Compilation and Critical Analysis of The Practical Philosophy of Karma Yoga (Set of 2 Volumes)
Selfless Action - Compilation and Critical Analysis of The Practical Philosophy of Karma Yoga (Set of 2 Volumes)
Hardcover
G. Sankarasubba Ayyar
$50.00
Selfless Action - Compilation and Critical Analysis of The Practical Philosophy of Karma Yoga (Set of 2 Volumes)
Candle Stand
Candle Stand
Brass Sculpture
14.2 inch Height x 3.8 inch Width x 4 inch Depth
$135.00
Candle Stand
Peacock Hanging Bells
Peacock Hanging Bells
Brass Statue
9 inch Height x 10.5 inch Width X 10.5 inch Depth
27 inch - Chain Length
$155.00
Peacock Hanging Bells
Nandi Muzzling The Feet Of Ardhanarishvara
Nandi Muzzling The Feet Of Ardhanarishvara
Water Color Painting on Patti Paper
Folk Art From The Temple Town Puri (Orissa)
Artist: Rabi Behera
19 inches X 39.5 inches
$395.00
Nandi Muzzling The Feet Of Ardhanarishvara
Shri Krishna Lila Pata with Kaliya Mardan In Centre
Shri Krishna Lila Pata with Kaliya Mardan In Centre
Water Color Painting on Patti
Folk Art From The Temple Town Puri (Orissa)
Artist: Rabi Behra
38 inches x 22.5 inches
$395.00
Shri Krishna Lila Pata with Kaliya Mardan In Centre
Bon its Encounter With Buddhism in Tibet
Bon its Encounter With Buddhism in Tibet
Hardcover
B. L. Bansal
$28.00
Bon its Encounter With Buddhism in Tibet
Divine Wisdom - A Book on Eternal Truth of Life and Living
Divine Wisdom - A Book on Eternal Truth of Life and Living
Paperback
Swami Gyanratna
$23.00
Divine Wisdom - A Book on Eternal Truth of Life and Living
Twenty Two Wicks Peacock Puja Lamp With Bells
Twenty Two Wicks Peacock Puja Lamp With Bells
Brass Statue
15.8 inch Height x 9 inch Width x 9.8 inch Depth
$245.00
Twenty Two Wicks Peacock Puja Lamp With Bells
Show More
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2019 © Exotic India