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The Vibrant world of Bomkai Sarees that leave you feeling like a regal diva

Bomkai silk sarees magnificent textile manufactured by the confluence of two of the most recognized components of the Orissa textile manufacturing. The name "Sonepuri" is another moniker for this saree. The "Bhulia" ethnicity in the Ganjam region of Odisha's Subarnapur produces the bomkai sari. All around the world, Kathak dancers regularly wear Bomkai sarees. The saree is traditionally worn as an honorable fabric during ceremonies by the Brahmins of the South; currently, the bomkai has become one of the most cherished textiles in the region of Odisha. It is spun on a pit loom. Bomkai can indeed be described in its simplest form as an extra weft procedure on a pit loom. This is the consequence of combining Ikat and embroidery simultaneously. The pallus is characterized by intricate embroidery, as well as the margins are typically in contrasting tones. The Bomkai saree has fascinating designs that are perfect for aristocracy since they draw its influence both from environment and indigenous art. Silk and cotton textiles are available for bomkai sarees. Bomkai strives to be distinct from the vast majority of the common features of patterns which are created on the surface of numerous fabrics. The designs and symbols reflect folklore and lengthy ancient secrets. Bomkai, in Southern India, is the hub of the textile manufacturing industry and derives its influence from folklore that originates in Orissan culture. Nevertheless, Bomkai does not disregard the free ideas that nature provides to everyone.


The ecosystem's offerings, including the bitter gourd, atasi blossom, little flower, fly, carp-fish, tortoise, lotus, peacock, and bird charai, are integrated within arrangements composed in the most unusual of ways.


Contrast color serves as the backbone of Bomkai Sarees . Furthermore, a black border would look absolutely stunning with just an orange saree whereas a stunning bright green border would look fabulous with yellow. The pallav may frequently have complementary colors, expressing a majestic gleam. Another common placement for honeycomb work, which creates tiny diamond-like forms, is found on the edge of a Bomkai saree.


The nitty-gritties of the Bomkai Fabric


Bomkai is generally manufactured through the procedures of coloring, preparing the loom, and weaving. Pit looms, dye vats, thread, cotton, silk, or dyes are a few of the components required. While Orissa continues to use the Jaala method to create certain exceptional masterpieces of Bomkai and preserve the craft's unique taste, the sector has struggled to withstand the onslaught of industrial machinery. The enthusiasm that people have towards Bomkai, nevertheless, is in no way influenced by how the industry is transforming. 


Numerous innovations within the domain of Bomkai industries are inspired by people's ingenuity and adoration of Bomkai. People from the southern regions of Odisha have imported innumerable Bomkai varieties to the present day. Some of the most prominent options include Bapta, Sonepuri, Barpali, and Pasapalli saree. The incorporation of zari needle work in Bomkai's weaving was among the most fascinating breakthroughs in its existence. The traditional motifs on the pallav established by angular irregularity have been given a new base in the guise of shimmering zari. 


FAQS


Q1. What is the specialty of Bomkai saree?


Bomkai, also known as Sonepuri, is a remarkable fabric produced by the fusion of two of the most well-liked elements of the Orissa textile industry. It is woven on a pit loom. Bomkai may be defined in its most basic form as an additional weft method on a pit loom. It is the result of weaving Ikat and embroidery together. The pallas are distinguished by delicate threadwork, and the borders are frequently in contrasting hues. The Bomkai saree has fascinating designs that are ideal for aristocracy because they draw their inspiration from both nature and tribal art.


Q2. Which state is famous for Bomkai saree?


The Bomkai Saree, also known as the Bomkai Saree, is an Indian handloom saree from the state of Odisha. Although it has its origins in the village of Bomkai in the Ganjam district, the Bhulia community in the Subarnapur district now produces the majority of it. One of India's recognized geographical indications is Bomkai.


Q3. Which material is used in weaving of Bomkai sarees?


Hand weaving with "silver" or "gold" cords is the method used to create "Bomkai" designs. The traditional tribal patterns used to make sari pallus include "flowers," "geometric designs," "fish," "lotus," "tortoise," and "hourglass-shaped drum." Bomkai, also known as Sonepuri, is a remarkable fabric produced by the fusion of two of the most well-liked elements of the Orissa textile industry. It is woven on a pit loom.


Q4. How do you identify a Bomkai saree?


In its border, the antiquated belief is shown. The pattern of fish appears frequently in saris since it is seen to be a symbol of prosperity and success. The border and pallu motifs' intricate thread work is the most endearing feature. The saree's look is considered simple and has a hint of tribalism.


Q5. What is Bomkai print?


The delicate threadwork on the bomkai sarees is skillfully woven on a handloom. The free-flowing nature of the pallu weave brings to life complexly patterned narratives. This magnificent, glossy weaving, which is unique to Odisha, exhibits traditions, a way of life, and mythology. The Bomkai saree is characterized by the use of coarse cotton, vivid colors, and high-contrast borders and pallus, which sometimes include intricate pattern work drawn from the natural world.


Q6. What is Bomkai cotton?


Bomkai sarees are an industry that employs both the weft and warp weaving processes, and they are woven using a low count of Cotton yarn. Bomkai cotton is easily recognisable because of its use of strongly plied cotton, its bordered floral and geometric motifs, and its pallu and border of contrasting colors (muhajirah). Red, black, dark green, dark blue, white, etc. are some of the most common extremely brilliant hues.


Q7. What is the difference between Bomkai and Sambalpuri saree?


Origin and style are what set Bomkai and Sambalpuri sarees apart from one another. Bomkai sarees also include elaborate Zari embroidery. Sambalpuri sarees, on the other hand, include elaborate Bandhgala embroidery. The patterns of Bomkai sarees are inspired by those seen in Ikat textiles. Hence, they differ slightly from traditional Ikat sarees. Sambalpuri sarees, on the other hand, are unique.


Sambalpuri sarees are made using a kind of the tie-and-dye technique known as Bandhkala or Baandha. In this way, there are stylistic distinctions between Bomkai and Sambalpuri, even though both originate from Ikat. Anyone may quickly and easily identify Bomkai and Sambalpuri sarees by their distinctive designs.


HOW TO DRAPE A SAREE



STEP 1


Two essential pieces of garments, that go alongwith the Sari, need to be chosen carefully to compliment the Sari. These are:


  • petticoat - which is a waist-to-floor garment, tied tightly at the waist by a drawstring. The petticoat color should match the base sari color as closely as possible. No part of the petticoat, of course, is visible outside the Sari, after having worn it.


  • blouse - which needs to be tight-fitting and whose color needs to be chosen keeping the look of the sari in mind, can be short sleeved or sleeveless, with a variety of necklines. The blouse ends just below the bust.



STEP 2


Start wearing the sari by tucking its plain/upper end into the petticoat, at a position which is a little bit to the right of the navel. Make sure that the lower end of the sari should be touching the floor, and that the whole length of the sari comes on the left-hand side. Now wrap the sari around yourself once, with the sari now coming back in the front, on your right side.



STEP 3


Make about 5 to 7 pleats of equal width of 5 inches, starting at the tucked-in end. Gather the pleats together, neatly, ensuring that the lower edge of the pleats are even and just off the ground and that the pleats fall straight and evenly. A safety pin may be used to stop the pleats from scattering.



STEP 4


Neatly tuck the pleats into the petticoat, at the waist, slightly to the left of the navel, in such a manner that they open to your left.



STEP 5


Drape the remaining fabric around yourself once more left to right, and bring it round your hips to the front, holding the top edge of the sari.



STEP 6


Slightly raise the remaining portion of the Sari on your back, bringing it up under the right arm and over the left shoulder so that the end of the Sari falls to about the level of your knees.


The end portion thus draped, from the left shoulder onwards, is called the Pallav or the Pallu, and can be prevented from slipping off teh shoulder, by fastening it at the shoulder to the blouse with a small safety pin.